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ipv6 simply put

Is there any basic presentation of ipv6? I google around and some goes in details like packet header, numbering format, etc... I just want to understand ipv6 from a high level perspective, like:
- what is it?
- why do I care as an IT professional?
- what's next?
- What's the plan to implement it?

Thx
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biggynet
Asked:
biggynet
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8 Solutions
 
bevhostCommented:
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biggynetAuthor Commented:
It seems to me that ipv6 addresses the IP addressing from the public IP addresses perspective. So how about my private IP addresses? how will IPv6 bring to my internal network? Thanks
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bevhostCommented:
Your IPv6 capable machines will already have IPv6 Link Local addresses on them which begin with fe80::

eg, your windows 7 PC's are probably using IPv6 to talk to each other and your Windows 2008 Server assuming you have these.

fe80 addresses cannot communicate through a router, so they are just for private use on your LAN.

Is this what you need?
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biggynetAuthor Commented:
I have Win XP SP3. How do I install IPv6 stack? Thanks
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bevhostCommented:
Install TCP/IP version 6 Protocol in Control Panel Add/Remove Windows Components
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bevhostCommented:
try this
netsh interface ipv6 install
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bevhostCommented:
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
You can install IPV6 in Windows XP SP3.  Then you can test to see if your ISP supports it here: http://test-ipv6.com/  You may find that some of the equipment along the path like routers and modems may not support IPV6.  One of my ISPs does support it (mostly) and one does not.
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nociSoftware EngineerCommented:
Is there any basic presentation of ipv6? I google around and some goes in details like packet header, numbering format, etc... I just want to understand ipv6 from a high level perspective, like:
- what is it?
A new version of the IPv6 (the version number changed, the addressing scheme changed [ it's primary purpose ] and some more modern views on streamlining forwarding of packets is incorporated. Think MPLS... [ IPv5 does not officialy exist, but was used as a precursor for MPLS ].

- why do I care as an IT professional?
IPv4 addresses ran out februari 2011 [ ARIN ],  APNIC ran out april 2011, RIPE will run outof addresses within one year.
So if new addresses are need some measures are in place generate new addresses [ like extending them ] .. NAT breaks the internet , IPv6 repairs this..
[ NAT can only extend the IP address with about 10 bits by using the ports as a kind of sub address ], IPv6 create 128 bit addresses.
Also any organisation now only needs an address PREFIX [ 64 bit address] then they can create their own address scheme internaly [ also 64bit addresses ].

- what's next?
Ongoing since about 10 years, adapt programs to use IPv6 sockets in stead of IPv4, adjust OS'ses to support it, migrate hardware... this was meant to have been done a few years ago, but very few ISP actualy did or still do something.
Yo can expect systems in Asia to be IPv6 only, and those systems cannot be reached using IPv4 nodes, unless you employ proxies that have IPv4 on one side and IPv6 on the other...

- What's the plan to implement it?
Gradualy implement it n your organisation. First infra [ routers/firewalls/DNS ] then systems etc. But now is a bit late to start...
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biggynetAuthor Commented:
"Gradualy implement it n your organisation. First infra [ routers/firewalls/DNS ] then systems etc. But now is a bit late to start... "

What do you mean it is a bit late to start? Does it mean that I cannot use IPv6 for my internal network? But do I really need to migrate my internal private IPv4 addresses to IPv6?
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nociSoftware EngineerCommented:
it's a bit late to start as there are quite some things to find out , like reselecting ISP's if needed, learn, experiment, investigate , design and commission... while the warning sign has been out for about realistically 5 years now. [ and academically 15 years ].  It might take the better of a year for a decent sized company.

februari last year the ARIN gave away the last addresses. In asia the are through their addresses. So in China, uKorea, Japan, Australia you can expect to see a rise in IPv6 only sites.

Practically since 6th of  june 2011 Google supplies IPv6 access, since 2012/6/6 they went global on it. In the NL only XS4ALL supplies IPv6 to anyone. Other ISP's are asking what the **** you are talking about, "can you eat it?" if you ask about IPv6...

Implementing IPv6 you start from the outside to the  inside and not like IPv4 inside out.

Ok some references:
https://www.google.com/intl/en/ipv6/   - quick intro
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ipv6    - contains various levels of info check out the external links here
http://www.ipv6day.org/action.php?n=En.IPv6day
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bevhostCommented:
You should run dual stack. there is much of the Internet that is only connected to IPv4 so you still need that.   However there are some things that are easier with IPv6 and there will be customers who do not have good IPv4 connectivity or none at all and you need IPv6 for them.

IPv6 is only partially supported on XP, eg you cannot RDP to an XP box with IPv6.

Your internal PC's could be already using IPv6 to communicate with other machines on the Internet, without your knowledge.  Most IPv4 firewalls will for example permit Teredo tunnelling.

It might take you quite some time to learn IPv6 and then audit your networks and replace non-IPv6 capable equipment.  Please don't buy any new equipment that does not support IPv6.
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biggynetAuthor Commented:
noci,

Good stuffs you got there. Thx
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nociSoftware EngineerCommented:
From those links you can find other sources of info.
Basic steps:
First experiment in a small network with at least one router in it.
 - here you can gain experience , verify applications, test setup
Find out what your ISP support (given prefixes, or prefix delegation [PD]) etc.
Find out what facilities you want (temp addresses, slaac, privacy addresses? )
Verify what hardware needs to be replaced.
then start planning, procuring & building, upgrading applications, changing configs etc.
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biggynetAuthor Commented:
It seems to me that if I am using public IP addresses then I don't have to worry about IPv6. I don't really need to migrate my internal network to ipv6 because ipv4 can coexist with ipv6 with dual stack, tunneling, or translation. Does it make sense?
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biggynetAuthor Commented:
noci,

"februari last year the ARIN gave away the last addresses."
I am a bit confused about the statement above because my client just got a /24 public IPv4 from ARIN last month.
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nociSoftware EngineerCommented:
*^%&% i mixed up ARIN with IANA...

IANA issued the /8 blocks globaly. The last /8 blocks went to RIR's last year.

ISP's can still get smaller lumps. (like /24)
In Europe RIPE expects to break their last /8 block in about a month.
They are now in the last 4 million or so of the "regular" blocks.
For addresses in a last block special rules apply. Like need to be able to show that you can handle IPv6 before you get a new block, they are issued lot by lot in request order...
see: http://www.ripe.net/internet-coordination/news/ripe-ncc-has-approximately-four-million-ipv4-addresses-before-reaching-last-8

RIPE goes through a /10 in about a month, it might slow down a little when new rules apply... but the end is neigh
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bevhostCommented:
In Australia and other countries, such as India and China, who use APNIC which has virtually exhausted it's entire pool, can no longer allocate blocks to existing ISP's.  They have keep a tiny reserve so that they can allocate a /22 to new startup ISPs only who can demonstrate that they will actually be able to use them.
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bevhostCommented:
You can also get IPv6 Certified here

http://ipv6.he.net/
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