Setting up RAID 1 using Marvell SATA RAID Controller

Hi,

I'm trying to set up a RAID 1 with 2 x 2TB Hitachi Hard Drives, using my Marvell SATA Controller, however I can't seem to get Windows to recognise the set up?

I've set up the 'Virtual Drive' using the Marvell RAID controller, which is accessed during boot up. However I couldn't see the drive(s) in Windows. I went into disk management and noticed the two drives their, they were 'unallocated', but were identified as one drive - see screen grab. I could only format one of the two drives? the other drive could not be formatted or allocated - see 2nd screen grab?

I tried formating the drives first before using the Marvell RAID controller, however this resulted in the same problem as both drives being 'unallocated'.

How do I set up these two drives in RAID 1 using the Marvel RAID controller?

SPECS:
OS: Windows 7 Pro 64bit
Mobo: Asus P9x79Pro
Disk-Manager.jpg
Disk-Manager-1.jpg
BPro2008Asked:
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DavidPresidentCommented:
RAID0 improves performance on some benchmarks, at the expense of hurting performance on other benchmarks.   Unless your PC is doing video streaming then realistically RAID0 is a BAD choice.

The Marvell controller is crap. It is a $2.00 controller and all the work is done by a dumb device driver that is incapable of supporting SSDs, or even balance I/O requests so that both drives work concurrently.  Don't enable it.  

Windows 7 native software RAID1 does load balancing.  Read I/Os are balanced so each disk does half of the work in a perfect world.  That means whatever disk can process the read request the fastest does it, freeing up the other HDD to satisfy other I/O requests at the same time.  (Meaning read I/O performance is twice as fast best case scenario, real-world maybe 70% faster most of the time)

On writes, you are no worse off.  RAID0, 1, and 10 have no measurable I/O overhead in terms of CPU or anything else.  The only time it makes sense to use one of these fake raid controllers is if your O/S has no support for host-based RAID and you want to boot a RAID0 that spans 2 disks.
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JelcinCommented:
Hello,

raid 1 is redudant by taking one disk as backup thus you loose 2TB. Your Disk Array should be  only as big as one formated drive. I think you must doing something wrong in bios of the controller?
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pgm554Commented:
Dump the Marvell controller for RAID  and use the built in utility in W7.

It's actually faster and more reliable.

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/36504/how-to-create-a-software-raid-array-in-windows-7/

http://kmwoley.com/blog/?p=429
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JelcinCommented:
pgm554 is right onboard raid controllers are not very good.... If your Motherboard is defective you are actually doomed...
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DavidPresidentCommented:
Use the native software RAID.  it is so much better.  Marvel doesn't give you read load balancing. Software raid does.
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BPro2008Author Commented:
Hi Everyone,

Sorry I meant to write RAID 0, not RAID 1 (it was late at night, sorry). I have set up RAID 1 already using windows 7 with two other 1TB hardrives.

Is using native software RAID still better in a RAID 0 configuration??
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Lionel MMSmall Business IT ConsultantCommented:
RAID 0 is normally used to increase performance, although it can also be used as a way to create a large logical disk out of two or more physical ones. If either of these drives die most of the data on it could be lost because to speed up performance it writes part of a file on one drive and part of the file onto the other--as an example data bits from one file can be on two different drives and so if one fo the drives die the data is lost, unless of course you keep good backups. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raid_0#RAID_0
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BPro2008Author Commented:
lionelum - thankyou, however I'm already aware of what a RAID 0 is.

dlethe - ok, thankyou for this information. The reason I was going for RAID 0 configuration is for greater throughput or performance in rendering video files. I've set up my system for video editing purposes, specifically Full HD footage.

I have an SSD dedicated drive for my OS, 2 x 1TB drives set up in RAID 1 for personal files (music, docs, exported projects) for redundancy and I wanted to set up 2 x 2TB hard drives in RAID 0 configuartion for rendering video files. Although I will be backing up all drives using external drives and Acronis software the files on the 'RAID 0' aren't permanent files. So if I lose them, due to one drive failing, it will not be the end of the world.

Based on this information my understanding would be to use the Windows 7 native software to strip two drives together in a RAID 0 array to get better performance in rendering large video files. In your opinion is this worth it? I.e. will I see a faster enough performance to justify this set up?
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pgm554Commented:
I pointed out before dieth that the controller in question was suspect and recommended the use of the windows raid.

To accept his answer as the only correct one  is my objection.
splitting points is OK,but my answer was first and essentially just as helpful.
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DavidPresidentCommented:
I agree, splitting points is appropriate.
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