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Why is my boot-up so extremely slow on Windows 7 Ultimate?

Why is my boot-up so extremely slow on Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit?

I have disabled everything that is possible to disable in msconfig, but it takes extremely long time to boot-up. My laptop is almost new with 8 GB RAM and i-7 quad-processor. I got this very long boot-up after I installed a lot of new software, but disabled them starting up during boot in msconfig.

I have activated keyboards for 23 languages, could that be what is causing this?
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hermesalpha
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hermesalpha
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9 Solutions
 
hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Raw boot time now is 133 seconds (the first 100-value in the event list). Earlier raw boot times: 119, 111, 134, 115, 174, 96, 121, 81, 64, 72, 82, 73, 108, 130, 183, 116, ...

Real life boot time now is 76 seconds.

You can see on this screencast that there are many warnings, error and about 10 critical boot performance issues:

http://screencast.com/t/bgUaaEn4zVDI

About 70 % of the whole list is made up of boot performance issues.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Here are my startup items in msconfig:

http://screencast.com/t/xXCEFPZbF2P
http://screencast.com/t/e8KtxExNU
http://screencast.com/t/kFakfe8Ra
http://screencast.com/t/NntZcAlIn

I really can't see any more items I can remove from msconfig. I installed a lot of software during a few hours, and this problem with extremely long startup time started immediately after that, so probably it's one of these newly installed software that is causing this. I updated everything half a day earlier so that can't be causing this.
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AmitIT ArchitectCommented:
I don't see any huge difference in boot time. Boot time depends what all loading at the background during startup. You can modify few services, change it from Automatic to Automatic Delay, this will also help to narrow down boot time. Else leave as it is, i don't see any more action required.

Hope this helps.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
But the boot time is much much longer than in the link http://itexpertvoice.com/home/what%E2%80%99s-taking-so-long-how-to-fight-slow-startup-times-in-windows-7/

And they say it's a problem if the boot time takes up to two minutes (which it does in my case, even longer!).
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garycaseCommented:
I suspect the overhead for 23 keyboard languages adds some time, but it's hard to say just how much.    You do have quite a bit of software installed, and the "diagnostic start" that's invoked with MSConfig doesn't eliminate as much startup time as actually uninstalling the applications would.

If these are all programs you want to have available, then it's probably best to just use a normal startup (not disabled in MSConfig) and just live with the start-up time.    If you want to improve it significantly, replace the hard drive with an SSD -- most of the startup delay is almost always due to the thousands of disk accesses that occur during bootup => and these are hundreds of times faster with an SSD.     I've seen startup times go from 2 minutes to 20 seconds when the drive was swapped for an SSD.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
SSD-disk? Instead of the internal HDD?

Otherwise, can the last posting on Microsoft TechNet be of any help for me?

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itproperf/thread/3596b55e-e21d-4185-95a3-8c4503987910
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garycaseCommented:
The steps outlined in the last posting can indeed help -- they say the same thing I did above -- i.e. uninstall what you don't need;  don't just disable it in MSConfig.   But no amount of cleanup will get the boot time down as low as an SSD could :-)
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AmitIT ArchitectCommented:
SSD's are 4 times faster compare to normal drives. However it is expensive. Just for few seconcd improvement, i don't recommend to spend money for SSD.
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garycaseCommented:
Actually, for boot-up operations, SSDs are far faster than 4x.

The transfer rate for an SSD is typically 3-6 times as fast as a rotating platter drive, depending on whether there's a SATA-2 or SATA-3 controller (and whether the SSD supports SATA-3).

But a far more compelling difference when you're doing thousands of small disk accesses is the access time -- and the "access time" of an SSD is simply the settling time for the NAND cells -- typically 100 microseconds ... compared to 15-18 milliseconds for a typical laptop drive  ==> almost 200 times as quick.    When you're doing a lot of small transfers (as is typical during boot-up) this makes a BIG difference.    It's far more than "a few seconds" of improvement for boot-up.

I agree, however, that other than the boot times, the normal operational difference with an SSD is modest.    Programs that might load in 3-5 seconds with a standard drive load in perhaps 1/2 second ... but that is indeed only "a few seconds" -- so whether it's worth the cost is something only the user can decide.
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jcimarronCommented:
hermesalpha--
"I have disabled everything that is possible to disable in msconfig"
Based on your screenshots I would question that.  
I wrote this some time ago.  Perhaps of help.  See especially Item 4.

"I offer several other suggestions since they often can contribute to a slow booting PC.
1) Have you scanned the PC for viruses, spyware, etc.?  (Be sure to use programs with updated reference definition files.)  Delete whatever these programs recommend.  And if you did find such malware, you should also probably install and run MalwareBytes.  It may find bits and pieces which were left behind
http://www.malwarebytes.org/products/malwarebytes_free
2) Disk Cleanup. There are several ways to reach it. One is Start|All Programs|Accessories|System Tools|DiskCleanUp. That will start a scan of the PC to tell you what files might be deleted or compressed. (The scan takes a while.)  I would certainly delete Temporary Internet Files, Temp files, Downloaded Program Files. See http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310312 for details.
3) Then I would run ErrorChecking. (left click on MyComputer||right click on C:\ drive icon (assuming that is your hard drive)|Tools|Error Checking. Check the box "Automatically fix file system errors". Click Start (within the error checking window). You will be told to reboot. Do so. Error checking will then run as part of the reboot. It can take a while.
4) Start|Run|type MSCONFIG|OK|Startup tab.  Windows actually needs very few thirdparty programs (the ones you see in msconfig) to run at start. Antivirus, Firewall, Antispyware, programs associated with wireless connections such as mouse, network, etc. would be among the few.  Uncheck the box to the left of any program you feel you do not need at startup.  Click Apply.  This site will help you make decisions what you do and do not need
http://www.pacs-portal.co.uk/startup_search.php
5) Run Disk Defragmenter. ((left click on MyComputer||right click on C:\ drive icon (again assuming that is your hard drive)|Tools|Disk Defragmenter|Defrag Now click Analyze) Unless the analysis shows defragmentation is not needed, proceed to run Defragment. That also takes a while."
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
jcimarron,

I just followed your fourth step with checking all the startup items. Two of them have been labelled as being added by TROJANS! But my Windows is completely new installed! How is it possible!? The first thing after having installed Windows was to install Microsoft Security Essentials and Malwarebytes PRO. And run all updates. And I have not visited any dubious or risky websites. How can then, already, two TROJANS added these startup items?:

IDT PC Audio
QTTask

And what should I do now? I run a full scan with Malwarebytes PRO during the night which didn't find anything. Haven't done any image with Acronis TrueImage Home 2012 yet. Should I do that anyway, after I found these two infected startup items in msconfig? Perhaps run Combofix first. Or should I do a new system recovery?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Actually, I did a download and install of QuickTime yesterday because it was needed to see a video about a financial software I was thinking of buying. Couldn't view that video without first installing QuickTime. Think it was this website:

http://www.merrilledge.com/m/pages/Trade-On-Your-Own.aspx?cm_sp=GWM-SelfDirectedBrokerage-_-EdgeRHModule-_-G216LT0020_ME-RH_ME_RHmodule_Trade_On_Your_Own_PhaseII.jpg-_-TradeOnYourOwn

When I didn't have QuickTime installed, I was prompted to download and install that first (which I did).

(By the way, I'm not going for this software, it got bad reviews.)
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I could see now that Microsoft Security Essentials had found 2 Trojans:

http://screencast.com/t/AQKkOmQmu6lp

So my laptop evidentially got infected immediately after I recovered it, in spite of I was really cautious and took everything step-by-step (first install Malwarebytes and MSE, then run updates etc.). And never visited any risky websites. But it's possible I got the infection when I downloaded the QuickTime-player as the QTTask had been added to msconfig (which is added by Trojans). And also, it was after this installation that the bootup became so extremely slow (although Windows, after bootup, works perfect without any problems).
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garycaseCommented:
Certainly looks like that's the case.     Did you download QuickTime directly from Apple?

... if so, it seems unlikely that was the source of the trojan.   I'd also think the Merrill Edge site is safe -- so it's perplexing just how you may have been infected.

But nevertheless, it seems you are ==> so let MSE clean the infection and see if that resolves your problem.    You have a LOT of "stuff" installed -- so I wouldn't be surprised if one of the other items was the "carrier" of your infection.   But it's hard to say just which one.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
I think I didn't download directly from Apple but via a Merrill Edge subsite (not the main www.merrilledge.com, but from something that didn't start with www). I let MSE clean the two Trojans and actually the bootup is faster now, although not especially fast. Absolutely no other problems except a little slow bootup (but not much, not like earlier now that I unticked a lot, perhaps 10 or more, items in the msconfig also).
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
How should I deal with these 2 startup-items (Trojans) that are still present in msconfig?
Would this work?:

1. I first wipe (use a file shredder) the two startup-items: QTTask and IDT PC Audio.
2. I then uninstall QuickTime from Control Panel (remove programs).
3. And then I reinstall QuickTime from Apple's site only.
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jcimarronCommented:
hermesalpha--How did you determine that Quick Time and IDT PC Audio are trojans?  From http://www.pacs-portal.co.uk/startup_search.php ?  In the case of qttask that is true only for Quick Time downloaded from certain sources.
You say that Microsoft Security Essentials detected trojans, but your screenshot does not work, so I cannot tell if these are the same trojans you feel were detected by msconfig or something different.  MSE should have offered you the option to delete the trojans.  Did you?
In any event, I do not feel you need either QTTask and IDT PC Audio to start at boot.
If you no longer want these programs on your PC, you can try to uninstall.  I suggest Revouninstaller.
http://www.revouninstaller.com/revo_uninstaller_free_download.html
However if you want to use them and have revised your opinion that they are trojans, just uncheck the boxes in msconfig.  That should stop them from starting at boot.
There is a Quick Time Alternative, which you might consider using instead of Quick Time itself.
http://quicktime-alternative.en.uptodown.com/
In that case you would uninstall Quick Time.

P.S.  More on IDT PC Audio
http://forum.notebookreview.com/dell-inspiron-dell-studio/475317-req-step-step-guide-remove-idt-high-definition-audio-windows-7-a.html

P.P.S.  Concerning the overall slowness of your PC, did you run the other suggestions I made in my lengthy post above?  And have you unchecked other items in msconfig?
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
hi jcimarron,

I haven't tried your other suggestions yet, just finished a translation job. Will make an Acronis-image right away now because the system seems to be very OK now. I chose to let MSE delete the two Trojans.

I unchecked a lot of items in msconfig with help from the search-service for msconfig you gave me the link to. After I've done that, and had the Trojans removed, the bootup time is acceptable.

So after I've done the Acronis-image I'll continue to try your other suggestions also. If anything happens I will have the Acronis-image to revert to a quite well functioning OS now.
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jcimarronCommented:
hermesalpha--"because the system seems to be very OK now"
That is good news.
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hermesalphaAuthor Commented:
Thanks, I received three very good solutions: Look for Warnings and Critical errors in Event Viewer, change HDD and use SSD instead, and a combination of suggestions for a slow-booting PC from jcimarron.

Now that I disconnected my two external HDDs (each on 250 GB) during bootup, the bootup time is really down to normal again. So problem is solved!
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jcimarronCommented:
hermesalpha--You are welcome.
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