Splitting an Access Database within a network

I work for a state agency which consists many file servers depending on an individual's location.  Although all staff have access to all file servers if they know the path and how to map to it, each person is usually assigned to a specific server.  

A database was recently created that IT staff would use in updating computer equipment during a refresh.  The database was successfully split and the front ends were placed in regional folders for IT staff to access.  When staff assigned to a different file server than what this one is located on tried to access the front end, they received an error message stating the path was not found.  They were however able to open the back end successfully which is on the same file server as the front end.  

My question:  Is this lack of access to the FE because their assigned file server is different than the file server the database is located on?  If so, is there any sort of work around on this issue or setting modifications that can be made within access?
jsawickiAsked:
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jsawickiConnect With a Mentor Author Commented:
fyed:  Thanks for the info, but i ended up figuring it out.  When mapped to a file server, we are mapped through a number, such as S for our Share Drive.  Since this is our vritual path, staff outside of our file server can't access itk, but when we define or write out the entire path, then staff are able to access it so all i did when saving the front end is just write out the entire path.
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Dale FyeConnect With a Mentor Commented:
First, each user should have their own copy of the front-end, linked to a common backend.

Second, if these individuals are part of a WAN, not a LAN, then you will most likely have significant connection problems (unless you have a very, very good WAN).  If you are on a WAN, not a LAN, I encourage you to read the following article: http://www.kallal.ca/Wan/Wans.html
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Dale FyeCommented:
If you solved this yourself, you should not accept my response as the correct answer, you should accept your post, that explains what you did to resolve the problem as the correct answer.

Click the "Request Attention" hyperlink at the bottom right corner of your original question, then indicate that you would like to reopen the question so that you can correct you solution selection.
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database ArchitectCommented:
" If you are on a WAN, not a LAN, I encourage you to read the following article: http://www.kallal.ca/Wan/Wans.html"

Sorry ... but it CAN be done as you know.  Albert is kind of living in the past with regards to what can be done, especially with today's systems and networks, His article gives the wrong impression in that context.
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Dale FyeCommented:
Joe, you will note that I said "most likely have significant connection", not "you will have significant connection" problems.

I know Albert's article is quite a bit out of date, but it is still a good read for the uninitiated.  

Yes, it can be done, and more and more so every day.  But your situation, my friend, is still in the top 5% (wild ass guess) of connectivity.  The vast majority of companies cannot come close the bandwidth you have available.  ;-)
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database ArchitectCommented:
" But your situation, my friend, is still in the top 5% (wild ass guess) of connectivity.  "
Sorry, but I doubt that is the case.

"The vast majority of companies cannot come close the bandwidth you have available."
Do you have data to support that ?
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Dale FyeCommented:
Only anecdotally.  I don't currently have any clients that operate a WAN.  Most are small businesses operating on LANs.

We could take a poll on the Access experts discussion thread, but that wouldn't be very scientific.  Would be interesting to see those numbers though.
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database ArchitectCommented:
"We could take a poll on the Access experts discussion thread, but that wouldn't be very scientific. "
Let's not bother, lol.  We already know how that would turn out :-)

Anyway ...

mx
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Dale FyeCommented:
I get it Joe, I just wish my day job was in an environment where:

1.  Access is appreciated for its capabilities
2.  I had the bandwidth for our remote sites (as much as 2500 miles) that you do.

Dale
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database ArchitectCommented:
Yeah, no kidding.
"Access is appreciated for its capabilities"

Thing is ... there are many Access developers who really don't know the full capability. Sadly, many are living in the past as to what could (or more like couldn't) be done in the 1990's and early 2000's.  A LOT ... has changed since then.  In many ways, Access has only been limited by the hardware/networks of a given time period.

I've offered many times for peeps to drop by and see what can ... be done.
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jsawickiAuthor Commented:
While the question was pending i determined that cause for lack of access which was described in the best solution.  Awarding Fyed the points since he attempted to assist me with the question and would have helped more if i required it.
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