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ipv4 and ipv6 network

Posted on 2012-09-10
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I heard about a IPv4 Internet and a IPv6 Internet. Are those two networks completely separate and they communicate with each other via a gateway? Is there a map or graphic representation of those two networks? Please tell me more. Thank you.
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Question by:biggynet
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by:SebastianAbbinanti
ID: 38383933
There are three ways for IPv4 and IPv6 to coexist. Those ways are Tunneling, Dual Stacking and NATting.

Dual Stacking is the easies to understand. You just provide your interfaces with an IPv6 and an IPv4 address.

Tunneling is exactly what is sounds like, and IPv4 packet is encapsulated into an IPv6 packet or vice versa.

Finally, NATting is again exactly what is sounds like. An IPv4 address is NATted into an IPv6 address or vice versa.

Dual Stacking is by far the most common. All Windows version vista and above use it (including server 2008 and beyond).

Thanks,
S.
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by:Eirman
ID: 38384000
If you read this and all the links you will know a lot more about IPv6 than I do!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6
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by:biggynet
ID: 38384107
Thank you for the response. But my question is: is there a physical IPv6 network? If yes then how does it connect to the existing IPv4 current Internet?
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by:davorin
ID: 38384120
No. It uses the same cabling as IPv4, only equipment is different - IPv6 capable.
In this days most of routers and other networking equipment have firmware that is compatible with both versions.
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by:SebastianAbbinanti
ID: 38384161
IPv6 is a protocol defined at the Network Layer of the OSI Model. IPv6 can operate on various Layer 2 Protocols (Ethernet, PPP, DSL, etc.). The actual cable would be a Layer 1 construct usually defined along with the Layer 2 Protocol.

The short answer is that it doesn't matter.

Thanks,
S.
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by:biggynet
ID: 38385020
I understand what IPv6 is. But are there two networks out there? We know that we currently have IPv4 network (the Internet). But do we have a IPv6 network (the Internet2)? If we do then does any one know where I can see a map or network diagram of thoses two networks.

The reason I ask is because I came across the gog6 tunnel (http://samsclass.info/ipv6/proj/he-cert-win.html). So to me it ooks like there are 2 separate network and to get to the ipv6 network, I need to go through some sort of gateways. Thanks
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by:SebastianAbbinanti
ID: 38385278
It may appear to be two separate networks, but it really isn't. Think about it this way, IPv4 and IPv6 exist on the Network Layer of the OSI model, but there are 6 other layers that were completely unaffected.

A web server on the internet would exist at layer 7, but it can be accessed by device with an IPv4 address, and IPv6 address or a device that has both. The server itself may also have two addresses (and IPv4 and an IPv6).

Thanks,
S.
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by:biggynet
ID: 38385344
Is anybody familiar with gogo6?
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by:pergr
ID: 38385924
IPv6 is the same physical network as IPv4, in most cases.

It is just a matter of two types of "addressing".

You can compare it with Skype and Google Talk - it is using the same network, but since addressing is different, you can not call from one network to the other.

However, two PCs may be running both Skype and Google Talk, so you can still call from PC to PC.

In the same way, your PC may be running both IPv4 and IPv6, and a web server may also be running both, so you may be able to get to a web site via any either IPv4 or IPv6.
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by:SebastianAbbinanti
SebastianAbbinanti earned 496 total points
ID: 38386784
Today, many network enabled devices have the ability to function on both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. However, legacy devices do not have this ability. GoGo6 seems to make products that provide IPv6 Connectivity to devices that cannot natively function IPv6 Networks.

IPv6 is certainly taking a foot hold, but not as quickly as was initially thought. It turns out that the including of private addressing space and NAT/PAT has substantially prolonged the life of IPv4. Moreover IPv6 technologies like IPSec have been integrated into IPv4 further extending its usefulness.

While IPv6 has many advance features and a seemingly limitless life expectancy, IPv4 will be slow to go. That being said, many IPv6 has taken a strong foothold at the university level--not surprising. However, we are also seeing IPv6 being heavily adopted in emerging networks.

Thanks,
S.
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by:pergr
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In Europe where RIPE is handling the allocation of IP addresses, we now have less than one month until RIPE is completely out of addresses.

After that any new ISP - or colocation provider -  that starts will not be able to give IPv4 connectivity, only IPv6.

In China there are ISPs that give only IPv6 connectivity already, and there are cases where European companies can not take order from their Chinese clients via their websites - since the Chinese can only get to the website if it is hosted on IPv6.

At the same time, many very large ISPs (previously government own) have not problem with IPv4 depletion - since they are actually loosing customer and not winning any. That is a safe way not to run out of addresses...
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Author Comment

by:biggynet
ID: 38387113
SebastianAbbinanti & pergr,

Pretty awesome inputs you have there. Do you links to the information that you just shared with me.

You said that "IPv6 has taken a strong foothold at the university level", do you have specific examples of university deploying IPv6?

Thanks
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by:SebastianAbbinanti
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by:pergr
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ID: 38389641
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by:pergr
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ID: 38389645
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by:pergr
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by:davorin
davorin earned 248 total points
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If you look more in details statistics.
Here is the list of university servers running on IPv6:
http://sixy.ch/tags/university

Visibility of IPv6 networks:
https://www.sixxs.net/tools/grh/dfp/ripe/
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by:biggynet
ID: 38390530
I am just wondering why the universities have strong foothold in IPv6. Any thoughts?
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pergr earned 1256 total points
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Most deployments so far are done by engineers who are curious or want investigate new technologies.

From a business point of view, up till now, there has been very little need to deploy - it has been something that could wait another quarter compared to other more urgent revenue generating projects. Possibly university engineers are more free to deploy these non-revenue-generating things.

In addition, for a service provider the most difficult part of an IPv6 deployment is the (ADSL) CPEs that they have out in the field - perhaps many thousands - since these often have to be replaced. Universities does not have that problem - they normally serve their users directly from switch ports.
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by:biggynet
ID: 38390811
pergr,

That makes sense. Thank you.
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