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Windows 2003 server - can swap hard disk to another spare server for redundancy?

We are retiring several old IBM x3650 servers (HW warranty expired) and are thinking of using them for non-critical applications.

We are also not renewing the hw warranty and are thinking of using another spare x3650 server for redundant parts i.e. if a x3650 server fails, we remove the HDD and swap to another standby x3650 (RAID volumes already preconfigured).

Will the Windows 2003 / 2008 server boot up? or will the Server OS detect a change in HW and prompt for OS reactivation?

Thanks.
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sidartra
Asked:
sidartra
7 Solutions
 
djsharmaCommented:
Server will boot but you have to update the drivers.
It will not ask for OS reactivation.
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tomcahillCommented:
if you're moving the drive to an exact same server, it will be fine.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
If the hardware is the same it'll be considered a parts replacement, generally speaking and you'll be fine.  But really, you ARE using a volume license, right?  If so, WHO CARES if it asks for reactivation. You're legit - reactivate.
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sidartraAuthor Commented:
hi thanks for the comments.

1. Both servers (Prod and standby)  are of the same model and hw config.

2. both servers have windows server coa.

I am asking to preempt if there is any problems I am unaware of before I actually test this.

so no issues with swapping hdd to another server for recovery ?

thanks
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
If the servers are identical, then what would happen if they were still in warranty the vendor would have sent you refurbished parts in the event of a failure.  So at the end of the day, you're really doing no different.

(I'm trying to demonstrate the logic of my answer so you can understand and apply it to future situations).

Bottom line is there SHOULD be no problem, but who knows - you're dealing with 8-10 year technology in software and 6-8 year old hardware, if I remember correctly.  Not exactly cutting edge and predictable these days.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
By the way, that assumes that your correct in your understanding of how the IBM RAID works - I'm not familiar with the RAID controllers in IBM systems.  In Dell systems, in the "old" days, the config information was saved on the controller and the disks and if one changed, you were prompted for which to load at boot (or at worst, upon entering the controller's BIOS).  But it's been a LONG time since I had to deal with those issues so my memory could be faulty.
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tomcahillCommented:
You can never say there will be no provlems.  Murphy's law states, whatever can go wrong, will go wrong.  However, you should be fine.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
With experience you learn never to say never... computer are logical... but people are not and people built and programmed computers so there are bound to be things that SHOULD work that DON'T.
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