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Low Bandwidth On Single Computer On Network

Domain: Windows Server 2003
Operating System: Windows 7

Our network has approximately 25 computer some running windows 7 and others running windows xp, I had an employee complain that the internet on his computer was slower than that of the other computers. I went to speakeasy and did a bandwidth test, the results on this computer was 8.3 mbps down and 8.0 mbps up, the other computers averaged 80 + mbps down and 17+ up the problem computer is a windows 7 computer. I was wondering if the problem could be the network card
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mickeyshelley1
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mickeyshelley1
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1 Solution
 
Rainmaker52Commented:
Ofcourse, it could be a hardware problem, but think beyond the NIC itself. It might also be a bad cable, bad wall patch, bad switch port etc.

On the other hand, drivers, background processes can also have a huge impact on performance.

To troubleshoot, you could try connecting a different PC (or notebook ofcourse) to that user's wall patch, and see if the problem persists. If the problem disapears, you're facing some kind of software problem (or the NIC itself).

If the problem remains, swap out the cable between the PC and the wall patch. I find this a frequent cause of error, because everyone seems to be kicking those cables and rolling over them with their desk chairs.
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profgeekCommented:
You need to first isolate the location of the problem by eliminating some possibilities.  It could be in the connection from the router to the patch panel, the patch panel to the wall plate (interior wiring), the wall to the computer (the patch cable), or the computer itself (conflicts, issues with TCP/IP, drivers, bad ethernet hardware, etc.).  Since the easiest to eliminate are the first three, do what Rainmaker52 suggests and attach another computer to the patch cable.  Simply bring in a laptop, unplug the patch cable from the back of the suspect computer, and plug it into the laptop.  Then do a speed check on the laptop.

If the laptop shows "normal" speed, then you have eliminated the patch cable and internal wiring as possibilities.  If it doesn't, then step two would be to swap out the patch cable and try again.  If that makes a difference, then it's the patch cable.  If not, I would try the patch cable on the other end (patch panel).  If that doesn't help, then it's the wiring in between and you'll need some testers to troubleshoot.

Assuming it's not the wiring (the laptop works fine using the same wiring), then your issue is in the computer itself.  At least get to that point and we can help you proceed from there.
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mickeyshelley1Author Commented:
Thank you for the suggestions I will begin implementation and report back my findings.
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mickeyshelley1Author Commented:
Ok, I connected a laptop to the cat5 cable that was connected to that computer and got a download speed of 88.5 mbps so that eliminates the wiring as the problem.
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mickeyshelley1Author Commented:
I then connected the cable back to the problem computer and  got a 9.6 mbps dn
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profgeekCommented:
As we suspected, it is a problem with the computer.  Now that we have determined that, what OS is the computer running?
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profgeekCommented:
Having eliminated wiring, the last physical issue might be the ethernet card.  Make sure the driver is up to date on it.  Also, if possible, do a speed test on the LAN to see if it gets normal LAN speeds.  If so, it's not likely the ethernet adapter.  I would then perform a complete virus scan and a malware scan.  I would use Malwarebytes from here:

  http://www.malwarebytes.org/lp/malware_lp/?utm_source=adcenter&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=malwarebytes%2B|%2Bmalwarebytes&utm_campaign=Search%3A%20Brand%20-%20US&utm_content=1333723436

Then do a complete scan with it (takes an hour or so).  If both of those come up clean, then we have effectively eliminated a virus or malware as the problem.  We would then move on to installed apps and then the OS.  But one step at a time.  Let's get the results of the malware/virus scans first.
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mickeyshelley1Author Commented:
Thank you
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mickeyshelley1Author Commented:
Problem was malware
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