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Excel Calculator Capability

EE Excel Professionals;

I recently saw a great short video about the power of the calculator function in Excel (not the simple calculator but the one that can do both scientific and business functions by changing the type of calculator in the help fuction).  I'm looking for how to embed the calculator function into a spreadsheet, automatically have it come up with the right template (i.e. business or scientific) and have a button (macro) that pops it up when it is needed within a particular sheet.

Any help on this would be appreciated.

Bright01
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Bright01
Asked:
Bright01
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1 Solution
 
aflockhartCommented:
Are you sure you were looking at an Excel based calculator ?

I'm not aware of any such feature in Excel.  I suppose it's possible that there is a third party addon that creates a calculator within Excel - but generally you'd do calculations in cells in the workbook and wouldn't normally need to use a calculator style interface.

There is a calculator built in to Windows, which offers advanced and scientific options. It's a separate program, not part of Excel. You can run it alongside Excel and copy data to and from it.
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Bright01Author Commented:
I saw this episode on Mr. Excel where he demonstrated the power of the Microsoft Excel Calculator (using access to HELP).  This is perhaps a very important "secret" not recognized by many people.  If true, I wanted to know how I could have it "pop-up" when in a worksheet/workbook and have it display a particular "type" of calculator -- i.e. business, scientific, statistical, etc.  I think with a macro control that could be possible.  

Check this out:

www.easy-xl.com

Episode:  1555 - Calculator

http://learnmrexcel.wordpress.com/2012/04/29/learn-excel-from-mrexcel-calculator-podcast-1555/
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SteveCommented:
Calculator is a stand alone exe.

can be run from VBA via:
64 bit: (change path for 32 bit systems)
Dim RetVal
RetVal = Shell("C:\Windows\SysWOW64\CALC.EXE", 1)

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aflockhartCommented:
It's simpler just to pin the CALC program to the Windows taskbar , so it's always one click away,whether you  are inside or outside Excel, and not limited to times when you are in Excel and  have macros available.  ( As various people have said, including "MrExcel" in the original video, the calculator is actually nothing at all to do with Excel.)

The program remembers which calculator ( standard, programmers, etc) was last used. This is a registry setting, so theoretically I guess you could write some code to change it - but is it worth the bother ?
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Bright01Author Commented:
Hey guys..... I'm not that sophisticated.  I have a Workbook and simply want to store the exe. in the code within the WB and access it with a button on the Spreadsheet.  I use the Spreadsheet as an APP. and share it out so that is why I'm trying to embed it.

Can you give me some direction or send me a sample of how that might work?

Much appreciated.

B.
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SteveCommented:
Well.. depending upon the instal you will need to have the code as above to open the exe from the location on the users PC.

I have given the 64bit code... the 32 bit just needs you to find the exe file in the windows folder and change the path to suit.

some thing like:

sub button_click()
on error resume next
Dim RetVal
RetVal = Shell("C:\Windows\SysWOW64\CALC.EXE", 1)
RetVal = Shell("C:\Windows\System32\CALC.EXE", 1)
on error goto 0
end sub

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Bright01Author Commented:
So since I share this Workbook and cannot control what's on someone else's machine, is there a way to embed the EXE in a Macro that is automatically called within the WB?
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SteveCommented:
The exe should be installed on all machines with excel on them.
So is just a matter of calling it from Excel (as per above code).
Other than the shell function you could write your own calculator in VBA, but that is a bit more work.
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Bright01Author Commented:
Works great!  Thank you for sharing this with me.

Big help!!!!!

B.
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