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How can I replicate an Access 2010 database similar to way I did with my Access 2002 database?

I have an Access 2002 database (the Design Master) stored on my computer, that is currently replicated (using replication manager 4.0)  to 10 other computers.  

We have purchased many new computers that include Access 2010.  If I convert the Access 2002 database to Access 2010 database, is there anything I need to do differently to replicate the database to the other 10 computers.  (Note:  I have read that replication has been done away with in Access 2010).

If replication is not available with Access 2010, can I just have 1 copy of the database on the Server, and allow 10 users to open it simultaneously?  If so, can I have a security feature that says, if you are user 1, you can open it in Design Master mode, all others, "non-Design Master mode".  

The bottom line is this:  I want to store the database on 10 computers, allow each user to make changes to the "data" only, then sync with each other for "updates".  What is the simplest way to achieve this?

Thank you for your help.
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peter57rCommented:
There is no equivalent to replication if you use an accdb file.
But replication was never intended for use in the way you are using it.
It was to allow users to take away copies of the data and work away from the central network.

If all users are permanently on the network then you should be setting the app up as a normal multi-user app.
Place the converted database into the desired server folder, then  split the database using the database splitter too. Leave the backend tables on the 'server' and give every user a copy of the front-end application.  If you want, you can convert the front-end into an accde after you have done the split and distribute that.  That will protect your forms, reports and code.
You do development on the original accdb and create a new accde file whenever you want to distribute it.
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
First, replication and sharing a DB are two fundamentally different things.

Replication was intended to be used when sharing was not an option (users were in remote locations).

<<We have purchased many new computers that include Access 2010.  If I convert the Access 2002 database to Access 2010 database, is there anything I need to do differently to replicate the database to the other 10 computers.  (Note:  I have read that replication has been done away with in Access 2010).
>>

 That is correct; replication was removed starting with A2007.  However as long as you keep the database in a MDB format, A2007 and 2010 will honor the replication.  HOWEVER, everything built into the product to support replication is now gone (ie. replication viewer) and everything must be done via code:

ACC: How to Use the ReplicationConflictFunction Property
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/158930

<< I want to store the database on 10 computers, allow each user to make changes to the "data" only, then sync with each other for "updates".  What is the simplest way to achieve this?>>

Before moving to 2010, I would suggest you un-replicate the DB using this:

http://www.trigeminal.com/lang/1033/utility.asp?ItemID=7

 or you can do it manually (which is a process and means basically creating a new DB).

When you do this, there is no longer a "Design Master" etc; that all disappears.  What you need to move to is a split design; a "Front end" with everything but the tables and a "back end" which contains just the table.

 Backend goes on the server, which everyone shares, and you give each use a copy of the Front end on their station.  You can share a FE off the server, but it's not recommended.

 In this way, everyone works with and updates the same database.  Depending on how your app was developed, that may mean changes.

Jim.
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