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data transfer rate

I think the biggest bottle neck in my pc is the hard drive, specifically my data transfer rate. I'm pretty sure I currently have SATA2, so I'm thinking about switching to SATA3, but I want to confirm things like, through put speeds of your basic SATA drive compared to solid state drives. Also, obviously, SATA2 would be slower ( i assume ) than SATA3, but I'm pretty sure I would have to upgrade my mobo to one that has a SATA3 connection, as well as upgrading my hard drive.
also, i seem to keep seeing mixed reviews of solid state drives. it seems like right now the biggest thing solid state has going for it is faster boot times. Currently my pc boots in about 30 seconds, so i really don't care much about boot times. I want the fastest data through put that i can get. any suggestions on what is the faster data through put for hard drives?
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JeffBeall
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JeffBeall
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3 Solutions
 
rindiCommented:
The big limiting factor of SSD's is that they don't come in the same capacities as normal HD's come with, and large capacity SSD's are very expensive in comparison. For that reason usually they are used for the OS and the most used programs, and the data is stored on conventional disks. This will result in the OS being faster, and also booting faster, but as the data is on standard disks any work with data will still be similar to normal. Of course if you can live with the OS and the data on a relatively small HD, and that size would fit an SSD, then you'd notice a substantial increase of speed while loading or saving or copying files.
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DavidPresidentCommented:
One buys a SSD because of how many I/Os per second it can do, not throughput.  Example, for $300 one can get 50,000 RANDOM 4kb I/Os per second.  That same amount of money can get you maybe 300 RANDOM 4KB I/Os per second.

If you need throughput on reads, and data is sequential, then you can get just as much throughput buying 2 mechanical disks and configuring software-based RAID1.   So for the same $300, you could get 250 MB/sec with either a single SSD, or a pair of mechanical drives, but the difference is that you would have 2TB worth of capacity on mechanical drives and maybe 200GB on a SSD.

In a typical PC environment, you don't really care that much about pure throughput.  You have a mixed load.  Many of the benchmarks are throughput only, however, and they are NOT real-world uses for PCs, so the numbers are pretty much useless.
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JeffBeallAuthor Commented:
I was thinking of through put because of the games i play on it. I was assuming that if you're playing a game, you need good through put speeds for the best game play.
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CallandorCommented:
The best desktop SSDs have sustained sequential transfer rates of 500MB/sec, but you need an SATA3 controller to achieve that.  SATA2 controllers will provide up to 400MB/sec; the difference is not noticeable from a user point of view.  You can buy a PCIe SATA3 card if you want.  You do have to consider if the benchmark programs represent similar workloads to the real world.  Some sites have gaming benchmarks to compare.

SSDs have dropped to about $1/GB; I would recommend the OCZ Vertex 4, Crucial m4, Samsung 830, Corsair Force GT, and Kingston HyperX.

Some notes: the SF-2281 controller is weak on incompressible data, while the Crucial m4 does not care about data being compressible.  The new Indilinx Everest 2 controller (OCZ) does poorly on light loads, but is good on everything else.
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rindiCommented:
Games normally don't need that much disk interactivity. For that type of use the GPU and the CPU are of much more importance.
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DavidPresidentCommented:
Games are read-only.  It is better bang-for-the-buck, if you need something > 250 GB to get a pair of disks, set up software RAID1.  Windows does read load balancing so you get a nice bump.

If you need a lot less, then go with a premium SATA-3 SSD.  If you have lots of money to spend then certainly go down the SSD path.   But games do NOT need a heck of a lot of throughput, certainly not 200+ MB/sec.   If games are choppy, then first look at spending money on RAM.
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JeffBeallAuthor Commented:
thanks for the help
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