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Windows XP machine(s) peridoically lose access to Windows 7 machine Shared Documents

I have a workgroup that consits of a few XP machines and one windows 7 laptop. They are all connected via ethernet; no wireless.  I put all my information in the Shared Documents on the Windows 7 machine for the XP users to access. On all the XP machines, I have a shortcut to the desktop that goes straight to the Shared Documents on the 7 machine. What has been happening is every few days an XP machine here and there will lose connectivity to it; the shortcut wont work per say. In order to get it to work again, I have to manually direct to the IP address or DNS name of the Windows 7 machine, or even reboot the thing. Its getting tedious and I wonder what the issue can be. I'm thinking theres a connection lost in the Windows 7 laptop periodically, but then it comes back online. I just want to make sure if theres something on the software side that I can set up or verify is set up correctly before I move on to a networking or hardware issue.
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joe_edmond
Asked:
joe_edmond
1 Solution
 
Run5kCommented:
We occasionally see this happen when Windows XP machines connect to a Windows 7 computer that is functioning as a file server. To alleviate the problem, you need to make a pair of changes within the registry of the Window 7 operating system so that it will allocate resources in an optimal manner for the Windows XP workstation.

Open the registry editor, navigate to the following key and change the value to "1"

HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Memory Management\LargeSystemCache

Next, navigate to the following key and change the value to "3"

HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Parameters\Size

After that, reboot your Windows 7 system and the problem should be gone.

Here is an old Microsoft KB article that explains the rationale behind the registry changes:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/232271
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