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dougdog

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is there really the need for 64gig ram and 16 cores??

Do we really need a database server with 64gig and 16 cores
Quite often we get consultants asking for specs such as this when they are deploying a new database server or sharepoint server
I know that it depends on the load but in the real world for an organisation with around 900 employees accessing a few databases and not all at the same time is these specs not overkill
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Brian Pierce
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dougdog

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i run it on  a virtualized platform
and due to this server requests are always overkill spec
We usually make a deal with the application people along these lines:

"we give you a virtual server that is more realistically sized. If performance is not good enough, we'll allocate more RAM/cores to the VM".

We rarely need to actually do this.

And remember: an oversized VM can actually perform worse, so it's in your best interest to start as small as possible and only add resources as needed.
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is that because say i allocate it 8x cores it has to wait to 8 x cores are available?
how would i tell this would it be the cpu wait time?
Most time they are not needed. But I suggest to give them what they required. Or you will be blamed someday when a SQL coder writes a stupid quary which costs all RAM and disk space..
>is that because say i allocate it 8x cores it has to wait to 8 x cores are available?

With VMWare this used to be true, but this condition is more relaxed in recent versions.

However, best practices still state to allocate no more cores than needed, because it still introduces overhead. Two VMs with two cores will often perform better than 1VM with 4 cores.
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what performance monitors would tell me it would be better to lower the cpu count?
Look at the processor queue length - under system - a sustained value of more than 1 is an indication that the processor is not processing instructions fast enough.
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this would tell me if i needed to add another cpu

what counters would i need to look at if i actually had too many cpus assigned in vsphere
I guess you could look at the average CPU utilisation.

But you really should do it the other way around: start small, add more if needed.
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are these vm monitors or windows performance monitors
CPU utilisation is one of the default metrics you find in the performance tab of the vSphere vcenter client.