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mwheeler1982Flag for United States of America

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Exchange 2003/2010 Coexistence - Legacy Hostname question

I understand how CAS2010 will redirect users to my Exchange 2003 legacy.mydomain.com or legacy.mydomain.local accordingly. Right now, our Exchange 2003 server is exchange.mydomain.local (which is a DNS "A" record).

When I go to assign "exchange.mydomain.local" to the 2010 CAS box, I understand that I will delete the DNS A record, change it to a CNAME and point it at the CAS 2010 box. I have already created the record for legacy.mydomain.local.

When I "take away" the exchange.mydomain.local" name from the Exchange 2003 server and assign it to CAS 2010, do I actually have to rename the Exchange 2003 server (change Windows computer name)? If not, could this cause issues where DNS is pointing to the CAS 2010 server but NETBIOS is pointing to the Exchange 2003 server?
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I've already got that squared away on the public DNS side. You're saying that there's no need to configure a legacy hostname on the inside?
If your Exchange server is called exchange.mydomain.local then you aren't going to be able to use that for OWA on Exhange 2010 until Exchange 2003 has been removed. If you try and remove the DNS record then AD will just put it back in again. So internally you will have to announce another URL.

Simon.
What about Outlook 2010 clients pointing to exchange.mydomain.local ? How do they get re-pointed to the CAS 2010 server?
>> You're saying that there's no need to configure a legacy hostname on the inside?

The default CAS installation has only one OWA virtual directory which has only one Exchange2003URL, suitable for both internal and external usage. You set the public name there, and then use something like split DNS to resolve that name internally. This permits users to access the same URL no matter which side of the firewall they sit on. This is the general way to solve that problem, and then don't use any of the .local URLs internally at all.

In Exchange terms, discovery and communication with the other servers takes place via the infrastructure exposed by Active Directory and its supporting services. You don't need to "switch" server names by renaming servers.

-Matt
In Exchange terms, discovery and communication with the other servers takes place via the infrastructure exposed by Active Directory and its supporting services.

You're saying that my outlook 2010 clients will magically discover the CAS 2010 server and their Outlook profile will be updated accordingly? And you're saying this discovery happens every time the user opens Outlook?
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Interesting... Outlook does more than I give it credit for.

Thanks for the help.