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joenswFlag for Morocco

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Active Directory

hi there experts

is anyone know where can i find  a free or trial domain name for my active directory and exchange  labs  and how to configure it

thanx
Avatar of Metaltree
Metaltree
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If you're referring to a public domain, you'll have to buy one, as far as I know

you can use a site like www.godaddy.com
Avatar of Manpreet SIngh Khatra
You want a Domain for AD or what ?
Just setup a LAb with any name and your good until you want to use External World to play with

- Rancy
You do not need a registered domain name to configure your Active Directory domain at all. Even if you plan to connect to the internet at a later time or now.

Let's assume your Lab is a setup for a company named "XYZ Services". You could call the domain "xyz.local".
If later on, you configure say, Exchange to handle your domain, you could purchase "xyz.com" if available or any name like "xyzservices.com" or "xyz.net" or "xyznow.com". Any name, regardless of your AD domain name will do.

Best practices recommend not exposing your AD domain to the internet and just opening up ports in your firewall to reach your SMTP server for mail delivery, and DNS for public DNS queries --IF desired. But DNS should handle a separate DNS-lookup zone for the outside domain.

If you expose your AD DNS zones to the internet, you would be easily prone to hacks where people will be able to look AD resource records no one should be looking at.

Hope this clarifies the issue at hand...

-XT
Avatar of Vaedur
Vaedur

Another idea is to use something other then a .com  For example, you could do ABC.Internal, that works fine.  Since you won't want to expose it to the internet.  If you are going to try to have webmail, then in exchange you are going to have to register a domain (sorry you can't do that for free) and can have the domain name resolve internally (that's a different topic).

So in active directory:
You are going to run dcpromo on a server to make it a domain controller.  YOu get 30 days of windows free before you have to register, which is nice for a quick test environment.
After you dcpromo you will get the active directory wizard, which from there, you can create a new domain.

In Exchange, you are going to join the computer to that domain, And you are all set, if you need more detailed instructions.

Active Directory:http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324753
Joining a domain: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms942519(v=cs.70).aspx
Avatar of joensw

ASKER

ok
if i want to have an active directory + exchange then i have   to register a domain .
sorry another question:
i can i have a domaine with ABC.Internal +exchange and user can resolve internally and  connect to internet and exchange server

and what do you advise me if i have active directory + exchange server
Ok. Here is the breakdown:

1- Configure your domain with ABC.local or ABC.internal domain name for Active Directory. Whichever appeals to your the most.
2- Register a valid domain with any Registrar (Network Solutions, GoDaddy, etc). The Registrar will keep your domain record and point to the "Name Servers" that hold your DNS records. Other information they keep is your name, address, domain owner company, billing contact, admin contact and tech contact, etc. If you do a whois lookup for google for example, you will see something like this:

Domain servers, or Name servers:
ns1.google.com
ns4.google.com
ns3.google.com
ns2.google.com

What the whois record is telling us here is that any of those servers ns1.google.com ... ns4.google.com are authoritative name servers and they hold DNS records for the google.com domain. In other words, these DNS servers will provide the rest of the DNS infrastructure around the world with the most updated info about any public resource (A records, MX records [this is for mail delivery--ie. Exchange], CNames, etc). Your local DNS server will hold your Active Directory records which don't get exposed.

Now, a DNS server does not necessarily have to reside inside your local network, but can (being a separate Zone file). For redundancy and resiliency purposes you prefer to hold those public DNS records at a service provider that has dispersed resources. Usually, the Registrar also offers DNS services.

If you registered your domain with GoDaddy por example, then your who is record will have NS pointers to the GoDaddy name servers. Then, within your account with GoDaddy you will be able to go and register the MX records for your Exchange server, A records for your Web and FTP servers and so on. These DNS records will have the IPs for your servers at your office.

3- You will need to open the firewall ports for the specific resources you want to expose. And map public IPs to internal IPs for the servers.

Let me know what point you need more help with and I will expand it more.

Regards,

-XT
YOu can get a free internal domain just by doing dcpromo, and it can be anything, you have to register a domain if you want to reach the domain from the internet which you have to pay for.

Then you mail.domain.com record should have the ip address of you external gateway, and your gateway should pass that traffic to your exchange servers internal IP address.

For example we are (not really) cat.internal  and can have dog.com resolve to it, the two don't have to match at all.
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ASKER

ok Mr xperttech

if i registered my domain with GoDaddy then i have to install the active directory with domaine.com
SOLUTION
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Vaedur

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ASKER

thanks  experts for explication