Link to home
Start Free TrialLog in
Avatar of solac
solac

asked on

Daisy Chain or Star on Switches using fiber

Hello

I have several Netgear managed switches, GS748T and GS724T throughout the plant.  Three of them are over 300 feet apart in different direction, which is why Im looking to upgrade or fiber to take advantage of distance.

Should I link all switches in a daisy chain or star topology?  Im planning to set up VLAN to segregate the network for video streaming and VOIP from the network.  The central of star topology will be located next to the servers.

Im looking at several mini GBIC with LC connectors, running at 1000M.
SOLUTION
Avatar of Ken Boone
Ken Boone
Flag of United States of America image

Link to home
membership
This solution is only available to members.
To access this solution, you must be a member of Experts Exchange.
Start Free Trial
If there is a core as per your description, look to have two core switches with a mesh so each switch connects to both cores.

With the cores connected and STP in place you will have a fully resilient Layer 2 Design.
If you can swing it, you might consider a partial mesh in order to route traffic around any failed ports, disconnected cabling, etc.

Just make a star topology, but also connect adjacent switches to each other.

Edit:  The previous post is a better solution, assuming you have two core switches.
Avatar of solac
solac

ASKER

There are two 48 port managed switches at the server rack, so Ill make it the center of star topology.  Thanks for the comments - make a lot sense not to go with daisy chain.

This begs for the next question - what device should be used to plug in, say 8 remote switches to the "core" switch?  Every switch I looked as either 2 or 4 available GBIC port, not enough number of ports to plug in the transceiver.
Well ideally you would homerun every switch back to each core switch.  This assumes you have enough ports of course.  So if the 2 core switches have 4 ports a piece, then you don't have the  option of running dual connections to every remote switch via fiber.  An option if your switches are all 10/100/1000 is to run copper back from the closest switches if it is within spec, and then run fiber for your longer runs.  If that is feasible, then you can double home 4 of the fiber connected switches.  This assumes that the run for the other 4 is within reach for a copper run.

Then again, if all that doesn't work, you can simply forego the dual homing.  There is always the cost vs benefit vs risk thing that has to be weighed.
ASKER CERTIFIED SOLUTION
Link to home
membership
This solution is only available to members.
To access this solution, you must be a member of Experts Exchange.
Start Free Trial