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Tahir2008

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Confused about SBS 2011 Premium

Hi,

I was wondering if someone could assist me and clarify a couple of questions I have with regards to SBS, additional servers and Premium Add-on.

I am looking at having SBS 2011 Standard installed on my network but also have 2 additional servers which can run SBS 2008 or SBS 2003 and need to be connected to the SBS environment, I am not sure at present if the software that needs to run on these servers can run on a standard Windows 7 OS.

Can I buy SBS 2011 Standard and connect these additional servers to the SBS network as servers without the need for the premium add-on?

I have been told that the SBS Premium Licences are just for the SQL side of things?

I have also been told that I will need remote user CAL's to allow the users to logon to the server. My question here is would my users be able to use their existing SBS CAL's and logon to the SBS server via RWW as normal? Would I need only the premium CAL's to allow anyone to RDP to the additional two servers? And would I only need 2 premium CAL's?

Sorry about the confusing post I thought I understood it all but have just been confused further by different suppliers and now am unsure what is right and what is wrong.

Thanks again
Avatar of Rob Williams
Rob Williams
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Firstly you can only have one SBS server on a network segment.  If they are in the same domain all 2003 SBS servers will start automatically shutting itself down after 7 days and SBS 2008/2011 after 21.  You cannot join an SBS server to a domain other than a migration and then remove the SBS from which you migrated.

 It is possible to have them on the same network segment if they are not in the same domain, DHCP isdisabled, and DNS configured appropriately, but they will not support trusts and it is a nightmare.

If you have a DC and CAL's users can acess other servers of the same year or older, but they need new CAL's to access newer servers.

No SBS supports terminal services for remote users to run applications, it is only for 2 admin accounts for server management.

Remote users need a PC or Terminal Server (RDS server) to whih they connect and RDS CAL's

Accessing SQL requires SQL CAL's or in the case of the SBS Premium additon Premium add-on CAL's if running SQL.

Sounds like you want Server 2012 standard which you can add to an SBS domain, and then purchase 2012 user CAL's and if users need to run applications on that server, RDS CAL's.
Avatar of Tahir2008
Tahir2008

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Hi,

Yes I was aware that a SBS Server becomes the primary DC and takes over all FSMO roles within the domain. I also did hear about the shutting down issue if you connected another SBS server onto the same network unless it was for a migration. Your reply has verified my understanding in this regard, didn't know you had 21 days for 200/2011 though, thought it was still 7 days.

Ok, with regards to this aspect of your reply:

'If you have a DC and CAL's users can access other servers of the same year or older, but they need new CAL's to access newer servers.'

Are you referring to a DC as in a full edition like Windows Server 2008 or SBS Editions as well? So in my example, a SBS 2008 DC and another Windows Server 2008 connected into the SBS environment?

You also said that if you have a DC and appropriate CAL's I should be able to access other servers of the same year or older but then you also say I need new CAL's to access newer servers, can you explain a little more on this? If I can use my initial CAL's to access servers of the same year or older why do I need new CAL's as well?

I am aware of the RDS limitations on SBS which is fine, most users currently RDS to their computer desktops anyway however, lets say I did want to introduce another server into my SBS environment for the purpose of RDS, would I need to purchase the Premium Add-on to allow the additional Windows Server 2008 to connect to the SBS network and then install the RDS role and obtain RDS CAL's? Am I correct in this approach?

I have also been told it sometimes ends up costing more to have the RDS server in place because you then have to have a different licence for Microsoft Office to run on the RDS server so that clients logging on to this server can access Outlook and Office applications, is this correct? Can you outline the licence issues for me here if you are aware of them, and if you dont mind of course?

With Server 2012 approach, if I had a SBS 2011 with 40 User CAL's and then introduced Server 2012 into the environment would I only need to purchase the RDS CAL's required for the number of users that need to logon via RDS or would I need to purchase both the RDS and Server 2012 CAL's for the users that need to logon or would I need to purchase 40 Server 2012 User CAL's plus the RDS CAL's for each user that wants to logon to the RDS?

Also in all of the above, if I did introduce another server for example an RDS server would the standard SBS RWW features remain intact and operate as normal? And if it was not a RDS server I introduced but a business application server how would a client RDP to this as I have been told they would need a RDS CAL or something? Not too sure on this last bit about being able to RDP to an additional server on the SBS network.

I know its a lot of questions but I am hoping this will help others with similar confusions as myself :) I would really appreciate it if you could reply beneath each of the above questions so its easier to read your replies to each section.

Thanks again.
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Rob Williams
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Hi Rob,

Your answers above were amazing, they have really helped me considerably understanding this process. Just to ensure I have this correct now, if I have any server of the same type SBS 2003 & Windows Server 2003 I can use the same CAL's for both just like your example for SBS 2008 and Windows Server 2008? But if its a newer server eg: SBS 2011 & Windows Server 2012 I would need CAL's for the number of users using SBS 2011 plus any additional Server 2012 CAL's for anyone attempting to use applications/resources on Server 2012?

I think looking at the costs for Microsoft Enterprise on RDS it may just be easier to purchase a dedicated computer with Office Home & Business for the few users who will need RDP access and add this to the SBS network.

Really appreciate your help with this, I would award you way more than 500 if I could :)
Glad the information was of some help.

>>"if I have any server of the same type SBS 2003 & Windows Server 2003 I can use the same CAL's for both "
Correct

>>"But if its a newer server eg: SBS 2011 & Windows Server 2012 I would need CAL's for the number of users using SBS 2011 plus any additional Server 2012 CAL's for anyone attempting to use applications/resources on Server 2012?"
Correct

>>"I think looking at the costs for Microsoft Enterprise on RDS it may just be easier to purchase a dedicated computer with Office Home & Business for the few users who will need RDP access and add this to the SBS network."
A common solution is to create some virtual workstations on a server running hyper-v or VMware.  You cannot do so on SBS, but you can on server standard.
Hi Rob,

Yes that is something I can consider, Windows Server 2008/12 running Hyper-V and a number of Windows 7 workstations. Am I correct in understanding that Windows Server 2008/12 includes the licence to turn it into a single Hyper-V host but does not include licences for an additional host operating system as well as the Hyper-V host?
Windows server 2008 R2 and 2012 full boxed, and volume license versions have 1+1 and 1+2 licensing respectively.  OEM generally does not.
1 + 1 (2008 R2) means you can use the one license as a hyper-V host, running ONLY hyper-v and then use the same license as a full virtual 2008 R2 server.
1 + 2  (2012)  means the same but you can have 2 full virtual 2012 servers.

You can also use the full core like (command line only) version of Hyper-v server 2008 R2 or 2012 as the host.

An ideal set up is SBS running as a virtual machine and add your VM's to the same host, if you have enough 'horsepower'.
Hi Rob,

Cant thank you enough for your replies, you have been more than helpful, thanks again so much, you managed to clear up a lot of confusion for me.
I have been very impressed with Rob's answers and support on this matter and thoroughly recommend his feedback and support, I would be more than happy to award him more if it was available.
Thanks Tahir2008.  Glad I was able to be of some help.