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Connect my PC VGA to my (really old TV) input.

Posted on 2012-12-22
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Last Modified: 2013-11-08
I would like to connect my PC to my TV.  My PC has a typical VGA receptacle.  My old TV has plug-in type input receptacles and also an RG 59 receptacles.
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Question by:brothertruffle880
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6 Comments
 
LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:Dave Baldwin
ID: 38715391
You will probably need a VGA-to-NTSC converter.  The data and scan rates of the two devices do not match.  This search will bring up a bunch of them: https://www.google.com/search?q=VGA-to-NTSC+converter

However, you will spend about as much for a VGA-to-NTSC converter as you would for a small flat screen TV with a VGA input.
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Expert Comment

by:garycase
ID: 38715401
Actually, VGA is already an analog signal, so it's relatively easy to provide a composite output signal from a VGA output ==> this will do it for less than $10:
http://www.amazon.com/Converter-Composite-S-Video-Supports-Resolution/dp/B007DNB6D2/ref=sr_1_fed1_4?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1356174783&sr=1-4&keywords=vga+to+ntsc+converter

Assuming your "... plug-in type input receptacles ..." are a composite video input and audio input; this box is all you need.    Your PC's audio output can be directly plugged in to the TV's audio input with a simple cable that has the appropriate ends.    [Most likely something like this:    http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10218&cs_id=1021804&p_id=665&seq=1&format=2
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Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 38715411
First check whether your PC's graphical card includes an "s-video" or TV Output. Many video cards include that. If not, I suggest replacing the video card of your PC with one that includes such an output. Then all you have to do is connect the TV to that output and select something like AV-in or similar on the TV, and on the PC change the display properties to use that output along with the standard VGA output. That way you can display things on your standard monitor as well as on the TV. The output looks similar to PS2-keyboard or mouse output's, but those won't fit in.

You'll have to be aware that old TV's have a terribly low resolution, lower than standard VGA (640x480), whereas the resolution of PAL is a little better than NTSC. So chances are that you won't really be happy with the output. You'll only be likely to get better resolutions with newer flat panel TV's, and those usually also include VGA, DVI, or HDMI inputs so you can connect a PC using it's standard output easily.
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Assisted Solution

by:☠ MASQ ☠
☠ MASQ ☠ earned 1000 total points
ID: 38715414
Are the inputs labelled?
If you've an old VCR to go with it you might find you've a bigger choice of inputs to use.
Is the TV NTSC or PAL (or of course it might handle both)?

Does your PC have any other analog outputs (s-video or composite video (usually a yellow coax))

We can come up with thousands of adaptors but without the detail of what outputs/inputs we've a choice of connecting it's all pure guesswork.

So far the only one we know for sure is VGA out of the PC and RG59 RF into the TV but even that RF input has a choice of formats
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Author Comment

by:brothertruffle880
ID: 38716008
I need to have a look behind my PC and my TV-connected equipment.

Will get back to you.
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LVL 70

Accepted Solution

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garycase earned 1000 total points
ID: 38716028
Good idea => as I noted above, the "... plug-in type input receptacles ..."  are most likely composite audio and an audio connection, but it'd be good to confirm that.    They are most likely (hopefully) labeled :-)                    The RG 59 input is almost certainly for RF (a 75-ohm antenna feed or cable input) ... but it's also possible (but unlikely) this could be a video feed.

Note that even if your PC has an s-video output on the video card, that's not helpful unless the TV has an s-video input (not likely from your earlier description).

Assuming your TV has ANY non-RF inputs, the little $8.14 box I suggested above will work fine with the VGA output from your PC.    If, however, you only have RF inputs, then you'll need to do this in 2 stages => (1) convert to composite (the little box will do this fine);  and then (2) use an RF modulator to modulate the signal on a channel you can tune the TV to.   You can also get these for ~ $10:  http://www.walmart.com/ip/19415715?adid=22222222227014714894&wmlspartner=wlpa&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=&wl3=21486607510&wl4=&wl5=pla&veh=sem         Regardless of how you provide your display signal to the TV, you're going to be limited to a maximum of 1024 x 768, and possibly less (800 x 600 will generally work fine).     The quality of the display is not going to be good for any text work;  but should be fine for watching videos -- so whether or not it's acceptable to you depends on how you plan to use the TV display.
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