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sharepoint 2010 database - data file shrink for service application databases.

Posted on 2012-12-23
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Last Modified: 2012-12-31
Hi Friends,

I get an message on Central Admin of SharePoint 2010 farm as a part of health reports:

1.Title - Database has large amounts of unused space
2.Explaination -
Following databases have large amounts of space allocated on the disk but not in use. This may be due to recent deletion of data form the database, or because the database has been pre-grown to a larger size. This database will take up a larger amount of space on the file system unless it is shrunk down to a smaller size. DSI_Search_Service_PropertyStoreDB on <db instance name>.

3. Remedy -

The database can be shrunk in size using the DBCC ShrinkDatabase command or the Shrink Database wizard in SQL Server Management Studio. For more information about this rule, see "http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=167144".

4. Failing Services -

SPTimerService (SPTimerV4)
I am pretty much aware about shrinking of content databases.
I want to know how much risky is the shrinking of service app databases or any other sp system database is?

From your ie expert point of view.

This db .mdf is 3 gb & not a problem at all.

started concerning after i saw this -

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc262731(v=office.14).aspx#DBMaintenanceForSPS2010_ShrinkingDataFiles
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Question by:Minesh Shah
5 Comments
 
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by:
QPR earned 300 total points
ID: 38717959
Is a bit of a silly message that one. Database contents will grow but when content is deleted they don't shrink. This is not an issue unless you are low on disk space. If you shrink it then the database will need to "ask" the operating system for more disk space next time it needs to grow to accommodate more content. This is a CPU intensive process and can have performance impacts if done too often.
Some time later when content is deleted the central admin message will reappear.
Personally I'd ignore it. If you'd rather not see the message then you can edit the monitoring rule to not show
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by:Justin Smith
Justin Smith earned 50 total points
ID: 38718443
Agreed with above.  Disable the rule, it's irrelevant.
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Assisted Solution

by:Sushanta Sahu
Sushanta Sahu earned 150 total points
ID: 38720974
With SharePoint 2010 became more database intensive as compared to it's predecessor, it's important that the health of the databases are maintained. SharePoint manages the databases on it's own and only warns you about any possible issues like the one you have mentioned.

The specific database you have mentioned is expected to grow significantly as a search database. It completely depends on the actual contents. Ideally a data file of with high empty space is not recommended just because the underlying SQL tier should be stable. However these warnings are not critical and gives you an opportunity to review the capacity of the databases and analyse the situation. If you expect the property database to grow significantly due to the content growth, you should not take any action. Also the log file size should also need to be taken care of. Ideally the log file size should be 30% of the datafile (mdf) size.

If you do not expect any growth, then you should shrink the DBs so that the SQL tier remains stable. This is worth to note that these are all prevention to keep the platform healthy and a good platform rely on proactiveness rather than reactive fix.

Let us know how it goes.
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by:Minesh Shah
Minesh Shah earned 0 total points
ID: 38722829
I am not going for this, ignoring this.
Not worth trying this since space is not anyways in any kind of alarming level.
If something has held up more space than should have been. i am okay for now.

I see Microsoft has document below in this regard.

1.      Only perform shrink operations rarely, and only after you perform an operation that removes a lot of data from a database, and then only when you do not expect to use that free space again. Data file shrink operations cause heavy index fragmentation and are extremely resource-intensive.

2.      Shrink only content databases. Users and administrators do not delete enough data from the configuration database, Central Administration content database, and various service application databases to contain significant free space.

Link –
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc262731(v=office.14).aspx#DBMaintenanceForSPS2010_ShrinkingDataFiles
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Author Closing Comment

by:Minesh Shah
ID: 38732221
ok
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