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Console menu

Posted on 2012-12-24
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Last Modified: 2012-12-24
Hi

I am building an embedded linux and was wondering what I could use to create a menu similar to the ones they use in VM Ware ESX

http://www.linglom.com/images/virtualization/VMWare/ESXi-Server/Enable-SSH/1.png

I know there is dialog but are there any other tools to use? Any better ideas?
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Question by:un1x86
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arober11 earned 500 total points
ID: 38718500
How's your 'C', as historically console based menuing system's have tended to utilise the curses library.
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by:un1x86
ID: 38718718
It is a bit rusty I must admit. But ncurses is exactly what I was looking for! Thanks
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