?
Solved

ESXi Setup/Sizing Question

Posted on 2012-12-26
5
Medium Priority
?
431 Views
Last Modified: 2012-12-27
Hello,

I have a DL380 G7 server, with dual processors and 8 x 146 GB 15k drives.  The box has 32 GB of ram.

I'm looking to use this to host an Exchange 2010 server as well as some other virtual guests but not sure the best approach to take.  I don't know how many other guests will be on the box, but I'd say 5 beyond exchange of the lighter capacity like a DC.

I'm always concerned about performance and find it harder now with virtualization to find solid information on what will work.  The location has about 100 users.

Just looking for feedback on how others would setup a server with these requirements.

Thanks!
0
Comment
Question by:mmicha
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
5 Comments
 
LVL 123

Assisted Solution

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 668 total points
ID: 38721836
with only 32gB of ram, this will be your limiting bottleneck and VMs.

I would create a single rAID 10 array, and install ESX 5.x on usb or flash drive.

so your exchange server will have approx 16gb ram, which leaves 16gb for the otherbvms
0
 
LVL 9

Accepted Solution

by:
newmath earned 668 total points
ID: 38721853
I'm assuming you will not be using shared storage. Two things to watch out for with Exchange: 1. Make sure that the logical disk is aligned properly. You can find more information on disk alignment here (applicable to any VMWare environment): http://blogs.vmware.com/vsphere/2011/08/guest-os-partition-alignment.html

2. Consider the pros and cons of block size. Not sure if you're doing snaps, but the smaller the block size, the smaller the snaps will be with Exchange. With Exchange you'll want to leave the default 4096KB block size on the guest side. Not sure what sort of controller you may have, but consider giving the block size a lot of thought -- especially coupled with the recommendation to watch for proper disk alignment.

You're spot on about the max VM limit. I wouldn't put more than five VM's on that particular machine. You could add more RAM later and probably add more with those fast disks.
0
 
LVL 7

Author Comment

by:mmicha
ID: 38721859
This would be done with SAS DAS...  No NAS/SAN type of disk configuration.
0
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:newmath
ID: 38721874
In that case, I'd still consider my two points above. Hope that helps you. You should see pretty good performance with 8 15k spindles. If your controller supports it: go RAID50 instead of RAID10. RAID10 has excellent read performance, but Exchange in particular will perform a lot of writes. RAID50 gives you a good balance of performance v. storage offset.
0
 
LVL 56

Assisted Solution

by:andyalder
andyalder earned 664 total points
ID: 38722211
Exchange performance will increase with more RAM and you should have plenty of free slots available unless your version of VMware is limiting you to 32GB (and I can't think of a version that limits you to 16GB per CPU). It'll actally cache more and so free up valuable disk IOPS for other VMs.
0

Featured Post

Comprehensive Backup Solutions for Microsoft

Acronis protects the complete Microsoft technology stack: Windows Server, Windows PC, laptop and Surface data; Microsoft business applications; Microsoft Hyper-V; Azure VMs; Microsoft Windows Server 2016; Microsoft Exchange 2016 and SQL Server 2016.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

When rebooting a vCenters 6.0 and try to connect using vSphere Client we get this issue "Invalid URL: The hostname could not parsed." When we get this error we need to do some changes in the vCenter advanced settings to fix the issue.
New style of hardware planning for Microsoft Exchange server.
The video tutorial explains the basics of the Exchange server Database Availability groups. The components of this video include: 1. Automatic Failover 2. Failover Clustering 3. Active Manager
This Micro Tutorial steps you through the configuration steps to configure your ESXi host Management Network settings and test the management network, ensure the host is recognized by the DNS Server, configure a new password, and the troubleshooting…
Suggested Courses

762 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question