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Access Linking To SQL Server 2008 Database Table Shows #Deleted In All Columns

Posted on 2012-12-26
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Last Modified: 2012-12-26
Greetings;

I am using Microsoft Access 2010 to link to a Microsoft SQL Server 2008 database. There are 2 tables in the database. Both have primary keys defined.

The first table contains 2 columns defined as varchar(2) and varchar(50). The first is the primary key.

The second table contains 19 columns. The primary key is defined as bigint and auto-increments. Most of the other columns are defined nvarchar(255). 2 of the columns are defined datetime. Some of the columns allow for nulls.

I have an ODBC data source to connect to the external SQL Server database.

When I create an empty Microsoft Access database and select the ODBC data source and tables - I can view and modify the first table, however, the 2nd table comes up with 84 rows of the word #Deleted in each column of each row. There are 84 rows in the second table on the Microsoft SQL Server 2008 database - this number is not a coincidence.

Why is this happening?


Much thanks ... David
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Question by:David Bach
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by:David Kroll
ID: 38722204
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Gustav Brock earned 500 total points
ID: 38722205
Access cannot read BigInt. Change this to Int.

/gustav
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Author Closing Comment

by:David Bach
ID: 38722238
Greetings gustav;

Much obliged. I changed the data type and it works as expected.

David
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LVL 49

Expert Comment

by:Gustav Brock
ID: 38722287
Great. Happy New Year!

/gustav
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