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nickg5
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physics > G force > 350 G's and 10,000 feet

Falling object from 10,000 feet reaches 350 G's at impact.
Any living creature still conscious at that point?
Would an animal die of:
a. drowning.
b. the impact.
c. the 350 G's in such a short time frame.
Math / Science

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nickg5

8/22/2022 - Mon
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TommySzalapski

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nickg5

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Swiss Air Flight 111, 1999. A you-tube video stated that the pilots lost control due to an internal fire and the plane plowed nose down into the Atlantic Ocean at 350 G's of force.

So, yes there was air, but the distance was 10,000 feet and the G's at impact were 350.

If all survived the G forces then they drowned or died on impact.
It was one plane, 228 persons, say 750 pieces of luggage, say 500 pieces of other cargo.
The result was over 1 million pieces, so yes 300+ G's at impact.

So, the speed during those 10,000 feet resulted in over 300 G's of force.
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d-glitch

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ozo

David Purley survived an estimated 180g when he crashed in 1977
Bacteria have been cultivated in an ultracentrifuge  at 403627g
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BigRat

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ozo

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aburr

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nickg5

ASKER
Elsewhere I read where 1G to 9G's in one second was fatal.
But, that was not stated in the context of a 250,000 pound airliner falling out of the sky.
Swiss Air did not break up in the air. It appears to have broken up at impact. So, free fall maybe with engines running from 10,000 feet.
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But, I think people have said a penny dropped off the Empire State Building has the same force on the top of my head as a 2000 pound car falling off the same building.
Air resistance makes a coin fall no faster and with no more force at impact than a chicken feather. I think that is what people have said in response to a question about a penny off the top of the building would kill you if it hit you in the head.
Your help has saved me hundreds of hours of internet surfing.
fblack61
aburr

"But, I think people have said a penny dropped off the Empire State Building has the same force on the top of my head as a 2000 pound car falling off the same building.
Air resistance makes a coin fall no faster and with no more force at impact than a chicken feather. I think that is what people have said in response to a question about a penny off the top of the building would kill you if it hit you in the head. "
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Unfortunately "people" are often wrong. In this case they certainly are.
aburr

Use common sense. If you were to stand under the Empire State Building would you rather be hit by a feather or a car?
nickg5

ASKER
The pennies "reach terminal velocity and no matter how high we put the balloon, they never picked up any more speed." Terminal velocity is the maximum speed a falling object reaches and is determined by the object's weight and air resistance. Because a penny is lightweight and not aerodynamic, air resistance slows it down so much that its terminal velocity is quite slow.
 
But not so for many other objects, Bloomfield warns. "Even if they're relatively small, if they're aerodynamically streamlined -- like a ball point pen -- they'll reach the point at which they're going a couple hundred miles an hour, and that's dangerous," he said. "Don't dump your handbag out the top of a building. Something in that bag is likely to go awfully fast."

http://abcnews.go.com/2020/story?id=3131332&page=1

The Australian who jumped out of a space capsule a few weeks ago, reached over 700 miles per hour in his free fall, before he pulled the rip cord. And from the live TV his body was twisting the whole way down but he was conscious enough at 700+ mph to pull the cord. There was an auto rip cord as well.
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nickg5

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