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tankergoblin
 asked on

career decision

Hi,

To those experts out there. i need your advise.

I work as IT for about 4 years already. I like my current job the only issue is i do same thing everyday.
Recently i get an offer and the salary is few hundred less than my current job. but it is a challenging job where i can learn alot of new thing and new technology. The job is not specific in one IT field. The job will be alot more tough in the sense of working hour and work commitment.

My question is in our IT field should i get a challenging job to polish my skill for my future career advancement or should i just stay in one place until the end of the day. i am 36

Thank you.
Microsoft Legacy OSMicrosoft Forefront ISA ServerInternet Protocols

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Sandy

8/22/2022 - Mon
Teeshirt

If you feel stagnant, move on!
tankergoblin

ASKER
my motive is to be an experts in IT.. gain more experience.. should you think it is good way to move on??
Teeshirt

"but it is a challenging job where i can learn alot of new thing and new technology. The job is not specific in one IT field. The job will be alot more tough in the sense of working hour and work commitment."

you said everything :-)
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James Murphy
Gary Case

"... I like my current job ..."   ...   "... the only issue is i do same thing everyday."   ==> Do you like your current JOB ... or do you like your current SITUATION  (e.g. stable job;  little risk;  etc.)??

From the way you phrased it, and the fact you asked the question,  I suspect it's the latter.   It sounds like you aren't really all that happy with your current job and are excited about the potential benefits of a new challenge.    If that's the case, go for it.    If that's not the case, ask your supervisor if you can expand your responsibilities to gain some additional experiences -- and check out the professional development possibilities at local colleges.
Dhanukadam

no think for money where u getting few hundred less than you current Job, but think where you getting to learn new things and knowledge as well.... so change the Job and feel the work satisfaction.
tankergoblin

ASKER
another question is i am 36 this year.. do you think what i learn and new  knowledge will get me to new level of life?

after all  we work hard and gain more knowledge is all about to have a good life right.. earn more wages.
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tankergoblin

ASKER
garycase,

i like my current job is because i have a nice boss.. my salary out on time, and i can go home in office hour.

but i feel like i was in behind already.. my classmate who graduate same batch with me have more knowledge in IT then me now..

Now my only consideration is, do i need those experience and new challenges especially in IT field do i really need it?

or should i just stay in comfort zone.
nobus

you have a nice , steady job, and boss, and like this situation.
you WOULD like to have more challenges, and gain more knowledge, but it pays less.
imo - the only one who can decide which to choose, is you  : is the challenge and knowledge more important than the salary?  if yes, you know what to pick

note in 10 years more you won't get any offers, so if you want to change, now is the time
arnold

In the situation you are in, do you want to be at the level of the boss of your boss?
Is that possible? If the answer is no to either, and the options at the other place are and that is what you want, move.

To the point others have made.
What is your outlook on the day where something unexpected/unseen before occurred?
Do you figuratively pull you hair out or is doing something new, troubleshooting an issue in an attempt to find a solution/cause makes the time fly.
If something that comes up causes you to dread the day such that it seems the day does not want to end, you should stay within your comfort zone and advance through seniority.

IMHO, it is better to look to be your boss's boss (level) rather than trying to get your boss's job.
Your help has saved me hundreds of hours of internet surfing.
fblack61
tankergoblin

ASKER
???

What does it mean by boss of my boss?

So you mean IT should not pull his hair off if he face problem and should solve the problem in seconds?

Then i think im not a good IT because usually i need to think how to solve the problem and after solve i will think how to stop the problem happen again.

May i know how to solve the problem in seconds?? any secret.. can teach??
Teeshirt

IMHO it seems you are lost. Your PSY would be the right guy to discuss this issue with..
ASKER CERTIFIED SOLUTION
Gary Case

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arnold

Does your boss have a boss? Or is your boss the owner of the firm?
There is a difference between not tearing one's hair out and taking as long as needed to solve a problem.
Tearing one's hair means you have not established in your own mind the process you use to determine/troubleshoot issues.

IMHO, the most important part of IT you should be knowledgeable with the systems/applications in your environment. What they do, how they interact, what their application dependencies and what and how servers/systems interact and how are they interdependent.
Knowledge of the environment helps in determining where the issue might be.
The reason is because when an issue arise that is not a server crash, the information you get is user A can not do X getting an error.
If you do not have a general set of the process involved, you have to go through with user a to see what they do.

IT is a broad term, is your job to support end user functionality, company applications, servers, network or combinations of those?

If your boss puts a box to figure out what it does, do you start right away or do you let it sit for a while?


If your company is interested in using new technology/solution, are you the one whom they approach to evaluate it?
As part of your normal day to day operation, do you see a way to improve the functionality/operations? Do you bring such info to your boss?

Do you know what your co-workers do? Are you in a position to be familiar enough with their duties to solve an issue for which they are responsible in heir absence?
Do you interact with them discussing how to solve X or Y whether it is your task or theirs?
In such interactions are you more concerned with being recognized for for your efforts or get satisfaction that you made a contribution to a solution?
The difference returns back to the question, are you the go to person when something new is being evaluated? Do your fellow IT come to you for your thoughts on anything they are working on? Do you talk to others when working on your thing?
If a new person is added to your team do you mentor them, or do you see them as a threat to your job?
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William Fulks

Earlier this year, I left an easy government job to take slightly less money with a private contractor and I haven't looked back. The problem was my govt job was so behind the times that I knew I was just spinning my wheels in IT, and I needed to move on if I wanted to advance my career. You just have to weigh out things like job security, future growth, etc. It never hurts to put some time into working toward earning some certs (Microsoft, CompTIA, etc.) to pad your resume.
Gary Case

"... It never hurts to put some time into working toward earning some certs (Microsoft, CompTIA, etc.) to pad your resume. "   ==>  :-)     Agree ... but I hope you're doing these things (courses, certifications, etc.) to ENHANCE your resume ... not to "pad" it  :-)      Padding your resume is a BAD thing ... if you get caught it can destroy your career.
Sandy

"NOOOOOOOOOOOOO"
I started with Experts Exchange in 2004 and it's been a mainstay of my professional computing life since. It helped me launch a career as a programmer / Oracle data analyst
William Peck