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Computers4me
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Windows Server 2008 R2 Create a User Account and make the account a local admin.

Hi,

I've created a User account In Active Directory on a Windows 2008 R2 Server. Curious how to give that User Local Admin Rights.

I've Tried Adding The User to the Builtin Admin Group and running the command

" GPUPDATE /F "  to update group policy's but did not work. When User installs programs gets prompted to enter Administrator credentials.  

Thank you.
Windows Server 2008Active Directory

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Armand G

8/22/2022 - Mon
Armand G

You can try to disable the User Account Control as this is a system wide setting for all users every time users installs a program.

You can follow this link: Turn off UAC for Windows Server 2008 R2
footech

Local admin rights to what?  Every machine, a specific one?

If you want it to be an local admin of every machine, the user either needs to be a member of a group that is already a member of the local Administrators group (like Domain Admins), or you can define the membership of the local Administrators group using group policy, where you would configure the "Restricted Groups" setting and make the user a member.
Lee W, MVP

You're not clear about what you're trying to do.

Are you trying to make a DOMAIN USER a member of the LOCAL ADMINS on a DOMAIN CONTROLLER?  If so, you CANNOT - there are no local accounts or groups on a DC.  For the user to have admin access, they need to be a domain admin.

Are you trying to make a DOMAIN USER a member of the LOCAL ADMINS on a SERVER or a WORKSTATION?  If so, then you need to put the user account in the local admins group of the machine in Computer Management.  

NOTE: once a user is in that group, they MUST logout and login again before the credentials take effect - when a user logs in a token is generated indicating what groups they are a member of - it is NOT updated.  So if you add them to the admin group, it won't take effect until they log out and log back in, generating a new token.  (A reboot, obviously) also works.

The advice to disable UAC is, in my opinion, VERY POOR - Disabling UAC, even for an experienced admin should NOT BE DONE unless it's the only possible option.
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Armand G

The advice to disable UAC is, in my opinion, VERY POOR - Disabling UAC, even for an experienced admin should NOT BE DONE unless it's the only possible option.
This is true but there is another way of doing it without disabling entirely. To allow admins to have a disabled UAC, you can use the group policy editor to change the settings to a: " Change this setting to Elevate Without Prompting to provide administrative privileges automatically" so that it will not be disabled to users without admin privileges.

This is the node for the policy settings: Computer Confguration\Policies\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Local Policies \Security Options
Computers4me

ASKER
What I'm trying to accomplish is to Make a Domain User on a Server  have Administrator Privliages so that when that user is  logging in from a remote computer ( Connected to the domain controller) they can install programs and updates on there local machine.
Computers4me

ASKER
Right now for instance when on the remote computer I can login (control alt Delete) and enter credentials of user. Every time lets say a Flash update comes up it would promp that the current user does not have sufficient Privliages to execute command.
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Armand G

Based on your reply, if you do have set the Security settings in the server, you may have to add domain admins into the administrators on each remote machine. It will have this user in the remote PC: "DOMAIN/DomainUser" format in order for the securities to take effect. Re-login and test.
Lee W, MVP

Still not clear to me.

What I'm trying to accomplish is to Make a Domain User on a Server  have Administrator Privliages

Is the Server a Domain Controller or a Member Server?  This is hugely important and you're not telling us so far.

Every time lets say a Flash update comes up it would promp that the current user does not have sufficient Privliages to execute command.

What does this have to do with your previously stated goal (quoted first)?  Do you have Flash installed on the server?!?!?!?  RDP shouldn't care who runs it so the fact they are getting prompted for admin rights to do a flash update should be irrelevant.  UNLESS Flash is on the server.  In which case, AGAIN, IS THE SERVER A DC?

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Computers4me

ASKER
Server is a Domain Controller.
I don't want to RDP.
 When joining a Terminal PC ( located in another office) to a Domain Controller the user account in the active directory sets the permissions on that Terminal. I just don't understand why I can't give certain Users more Permission and other users standard permissions.
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Computers4me

ASKER
Sorry,
just thought when I mentioned Active Directory would mean that server was a Domain Controller.
hirenvmajithiya

As per your requirement, you have to add a user to local administrators group on that specific server.

Open server manager in server, then add that AD user in "Administrators" group and then....
that's all.
Computers4me

ASKER
Where in Server Manager do you do that??
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footech

I'm having trouble understanding you.  First you said
...when that user is  logging in from a remote computer...
which to me means that you are using a RDP connection from a remote computer to the server you're asking about.  But then you say
...I don't want to RDP...
Next, you say
When joining a Terminal PC ( located in another office) to a Domain Controller the user account in the active directory sets the permissions on that Terminal.
I just don't know how to interpret this.  I assume by Terminal PC you're not referring to a Terminal Server, but just something like a standard workstation.  But what do you mean by "joining" - joining to the domain, or just logging on to it?

However, maybe the fact that I don't understand what you're describing isn't important.  If this is a domain controller, any user that is a member of BuiltIn\Administrators should not encounter a prompt for any other credentials, though I would strongly advise that only Domain Admins should be allowed administrative permissions on any DC.  For any other workstations or servers that are members of the domain, it has already been mentioned how to make a domain user an administrator of that computer.
Computers4me

ASKER
Thank you Guys for all your help. Figured out how to solve my problem.
Computers4me

ASKER
I added User in Active directory to the Built-in Administrators Group didn't do anything. I Tried Addind User To Domain Admins Group Still Nothing. The I tried The Group
"Enterprise Admins" and now account is doing exactly what I needed.
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William Peck
Computers4me

ASKER
**An update**

That's really strange. I was able to login on the computer using a users active directory credentials but none of the policies to any groups followed. So in the login window I entered:

User: (Domain) \ Userxyz
Password: ********

This login worked but no group policies followed:
user: Userxyz
Password: ******

And all the Group Policies worked so I deleted Enterprise Admins and it's still working. I can't belive it was something as crazy as that.
Computers4me

ASKER
But Userxyz isn't a user on that local computer.
ASKER CERTIFIED SOLUTION
Armand G

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