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Best ap for changing partition sizes ?

Customer has a 1x 500 gig hdd on his pc.  c: drive 20 gig an d 480. I didn't set it up like that !

How to make this 250 on c and 250 on d:

D: contains a small amount of data
1 Solution
MiniTool Partition Wizard Home Edition
Easeus Partition Master Home Edition
Ivano ViolaSystem AdministratorCommented:
I would backup the data located on the D: Drive. Using disk management delete the D: partition (after data backup). Once deleted you will be able to extend the C: partition using the free space available. Extend the partition by 230GB. Once this is done create a new partition with the free space available. Assign the drive letter D: and restore the data from the backup.

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Gerwin Jansen, EE MVETopic Advisor Commented:
What do you mean by 'best'? You can use Windows7 Disk Management to do this.

To add to above comments always backup important data before working with partitions, resizing etc.
☠ MASQ ☠Commented:
You could use Windows (:))
In Computer Management/Disk Management use the option to shrink the partition with the free space, then expand the Windows partition to use the space you've freed up.
fcekAuthor Commented:
Sorry I meant to say its XP.
fcekAuthor Commented:
Will clone the drive before I try anything.  Thanks.
Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
Cloning before modifying is certainly a good idea :-)

But the process is very simple -- you just need to do 3 steps:

(1)  Resize D: to free up the space you need.
(2)  "Slide" D: so the free space is between C: and D:
(3)  Resize C:

Done :-)

You can easily do these with the free demo version of Boot-It BM  [http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-bare-metal.htm ]

Download it;  extract the files;  create a bootable CD with the included MakeDisk utility;  then do the following ....

(a)  Boot to the CD; selecting CANCEL at the first prompt; then OK to go to Maintenance Mode.

(b)  Click on Partition Work

(c)  Highlight the 2nd partition (this corresponds to D: -- it should be obvious from the size.   Then click on ReSize and make it the desired size.    This operation should be fairly quick (VERY quick if there's not much data on D:, as you implied)

(d)  With the same (now resized) partition highlighted, click on Slide ... and choose 0 free space "After".     Wait for this to complete => this is the longest step, as it needs to move all of the data on D:

(e)  Now highlight the first partition (corresponding to C:);  and click on ReSize.   Select the new size (the max available) and let it finish [This will be VERY quick].

Done !!    Just click on Close, then on Reboot => and the system will reboot to XP.    XP will "find new hardware", as it thinks the drive has changed (it's now larger) ... but after a 2nd reboot you're done.

Here's an outline of what you're doing pictorially:

Your disk now looks like this:

After you resize D:, it looks like this:
... where the x's are free space

But you can't add the free space to C:, because D: is "in the way"

After the "Slide", the disk looks like this:

THEN you can resize C:, and the disk looks like this:
I use a gparted bootable CD.  Just press enter at the prompts during boot and you get a nice visual representation of the drive.  Click on the drive, click resize and drag the slider.

fcekAuthor Commented:
garycase - Even with a cloned drive for practice I was "planking it".
All looks good as I go for a reboot.
....................... results in .................. and its working.

What a bit of software that is. Fab and for free!

You are a good man garycase, its not true what they say about you !
fcekAuthor Commented:
Great ap.

You can easily do these with the free demo version of Boot-It BM  [http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-bare-metal.htm ]

Ive a feeling that the .iso puts the burn date in the ap.  When it boots it compares its date to the BIOS date.  

If its say 30+ days later you have to buy the ap as the disk you created knows its 30+ days old and wont work.

So Months later if the BIOS date were to be changed in the PC to match the date you made the CD .... Reminds me of that song ........... "forever young" by Alpha Ville.

I havnt tried it ...........
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