vmware vmdk storage suggestion over 2TB

I'm going to virtualize a file server that currently houses 2.5 TB of data on DAS.  I'd like to migrate that data to our SAN but need to figure out how to deal with the 2TB vmdk limit.

I think the best way to handle would be to create a 4TB LUN on the san, attach to the san with the current file server and copy data to the new LUN.  Then P2V the server and create a RDM to the LUN.  Is this the correct way to handle?  Any other suggestions or recommendations?  Thanks!
LVL 1
jcneil4Asked:
Who is Participating?

Improve company productivity with a Business Account.Sign Up

x
 
coolsport00Connect With a Mentor Commented:
With vSphere 5, as @hanccocka eludes to with his Option 1, you can use *PHYSICAL* RDM (not virtual) and have up to a 64TB LUN attached to a VM. Now, in saying that, if you go that route, you lose some vSphere features/functions (no snapshotting or FT capability for example).

What I did for my file server VM was create 2 VMDKs of 1.7TB then added them to my VM, made them Dynamic disks then 'extended' them in Windows to be as 1 logical volume. (@hanccocka's 3rd option above).

How you choose to do it is really up to you. If your data is on a SAN LUN, using RDM is best initially converting from a physical file server to a VM file server because you only need to P2V the system volume (assuming that is only 30-40GB), then just connect your file storage volume (LUNs) from your SAN as RDMs to your VM.

Regards.
~coolsport00
0
 
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)Connect With a Mentor VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
a number of options

1. use a RAW Device Mapped LUN on your SAN
2. use a LUN on your SAN (LUN) mapped to the VM using Microsoft iSCSI Initiator in the VM
3. use two 1TB vmdks and Extend them in the VM to 2TB

I would recommend option 1.
0
 
jcneil4Author Commented:
Yeah guess RDM is the best option, just wanted some confirmation.  Thanks
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.