Routing internet traffic over point to point connection

I have an AT&T OPT-E-MAN fiber connection between my 2 remote locations. I have a fiber handoff at each end which I have connected to my switches at each location. I am using powerconnect 6224 at one site and powerconnect 7024 at the other. My intent is to have all traffic which is not destined for the local LAN head over the fiber to my main plant.
So what I have done so far…
-      I created a new VLAN on each switch for the fiber port. VLAN 75 and assigned the IP 10.10.75.1 on one switch and 10.10.75.2 on the other switch.
-      I am only using static routes on the switches for my other VLAN’s and not using any routing protocols.
-      I changed the default route which I used to have set as 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.50.2 which is the IP of my firewall. So that any traffic that is not known, goes out the firewall. Internet and the like… and that of course works as expected.
-      I set the default route to 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.75.1 at my remote office (which has the VLAN 75 IP set up as 10.10.75.2) and my traffic between the 2 locations worked fine.
-      I could not get the internet traffic to flow over the line though. It would get as far as 10.10.75.2 and drop, according to a tracert.
Any suggestions on how to set this up?
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ademboAsked:
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rharland2009Connect With a Mentor Commented:
My first question is this.
On the 10.10.75.2 switch, is there a route for the traffic destined to/from the internet to make it back to your remote location?
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ademboAuthor Commented:
I was able to interact with all the LAN devices that were on the 10.10.75.1 switch side from the 10.10.75.2 switch. So it was able to route the LAN traffic. As far as the internet traffic, I guess I dont really know how to answer that. I had a route set up on my firewall that gave the next hop IP of 10.10.75.2, but that didnt seem to help.

Thanks
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rharland2009Commented:
well, picture this....so imagine your remote office is literally an extension of your normal LAN in your main building. The subnets are separate, etc., but it's all in the same building.
We'll call your remote office subnet 2 and your main subnet 1.
Now, Subnet 2's switch can likely interact with subnet 1 because there's a direct connection between them - your OPT-e link.
In addition, though, there needs to be a route - at the main office - that tells traffic (not only from the Internet but from subnet 1) how to get to subnet 2.
Just to verify, the ATT link gives you point-to-point connectivity at layer 2 without any extra hardware, right?
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ademboAuthor Commented:
Correct, no extra hardware. Its solely an extension of my existing network.
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rharland2009Commented:
Okay, great. So let's narrow it down.
Give us the subnet info for your main location and remote, and we can likely get you rolling pretty quickly.
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