Link to home
Create AccountLog in
Avatar of Pau Lo
Pau Lo

asked on

Folder redirection basics

In our users networked home drives is a “desktop” folder. i.e. H:\desktop

Also in our users home drives is a \profile\desktop folder, i.e. H:\profile\desktop

If I create a file in H:\profile\desktop it then appears on my computers desktop.

If I create a file in H:\desktop it appears if I logon to a citrix xenapp server.

What are these both these scenarios folders referred to as in tech speak?

How does it work? I.e. how does logging on to a citrix server show the contents of H:\desktop ?
SOLUTION
Avatar of Randy Downs
Randy Downs
Flag of United States of America image

Link to home
membership
Create an account to see this answer
Signing up is free. No credit card required.
Create Account
SOLUTION
Link to home
membership
Create an account to see this answer
Signing up is free. No credit card required.
Create Account
ASKER CERTIFIED SOLUTION
Link to home
membership
Create an account to see this answer
Signing up is free. No credit card required.
Create Account
Avatar of Pau Lo
Pau Lo

ASKER

>>normally keep two different profiles

is a profile something different to an AD account? where can you see the actual profile settings?
Avatar of Pau Lo

ASKER

and from a low tech management standpoint why would you have 2 profiles? can you provide some examples?
Every AD account needs a profile which will contain his desktop icons/folder/files, documents, favourites, application data, temporary files etc... Depending on the type of the profile set, the profile might be saved in shared path on the network, or it might be specific to a certain computer.

The setting for the profile will be either made on the account's 'profile' tab in AD or using a GPO linked to the OU where the account exists. Note also that each account has two tabs for profile settings: 'profile' tab and the 'Terminal Services Profile' tab. So you can set two different profiles in two different locations on the network; then depending on what the user will be accessing the corresponding profile will be loaded with all its settings.

You will want to have two different profiles for the following non-exhaustive scenarios:
1. Simply you do not want to mix the work done on terminal services with that on normal desktops - for example a company which provides terminal services for specific jobs to be done different from a desktop job and wouldn't want to have the user mix his settings/files
2. From an IT administrative perspective it would be easier to troubleshoot/maintain when you know a user would have two distinct profiles for the different environments
3. You would like to have different scripts to run when a user logs on to terminal services from when he/she logs on to normal desktop - for example drive mappings should be different
Avatar of Pau Lo

ASKER

Ok thanks. So say a user who doesn't have a laptop and uses a wyse terminal, they'd just have a terminal profile, whereas a laptop user would probably have both a normal profile and a terminal profile?
Yep; and that if the laptop user is configured for a terminal profile.
UNC paths must be used
SOLUTION
Link to home
membership
Create an account to see this answer
Signing up is free. No credit card required.
Create Account