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Legacy Access database with a table having ID's in a key field

Posted on 2013-01-04
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Last Modified: 2013-01-05
OK EE; here's the back story:

Inherited a very well developed Access database.  Construction started in ~2000 and queries,  forms & reports have been building ever since.  Again, its well built and it has been repurposed for many like projects for the better part of ten years.  The database was properly split with tables on the back end and a well formed user interface for local machines.  All is well, but here's the thing; company is growing and outgrowing access.  We are lab testing SharePoint as an alternative with moderate success.  We're not convinced SharePoint is the way to go and we are looking at Filemaker as the real need for 90% of users is reporting and not data entry.

Now, the question/issue; using Access services in SharePoint is a flop given the vintage of the database.  Too many issues with the queries & reports not being web ready.  Strike one SharePoint.  But, we have hade moderate success testing the importation of just the tables and allowing the front end of access connect, with one exception, leading me to the issues/question:

There is a simple 13 record table that is very linked up in all forms, queries & reports.  The primary key in this table is headed as "ID" and to make matters worse, when the db was repurposed, the ID's sequence started after the last old record was purged.  This makes the first ID start at 37 and not 1.  So of all things that went well in the test conversion to SharePoint, this one table caused SharePoint to create a new column labeled "_OldID" and the standard "new" ID column in SharePoint started numbering 1 to 13.  This of course blows up all the queries, etc. in the Access front end, as they do not recognize 1 to 13.

So, the actual ID values in the original Access database are intractable in order 37 to 49, while the SharePoint "new" ID's are intractably set from 1 to 13.  I would like to attack this at the SharePoint lists (tables) if possible, up to and including scrapping SharePoint and using Filemaker.

Short version?  Is it possible to change the ID values in the SharePoint list? (it’s a one time thing so manually is OK.)  Or is there some magic that can be done before importing the tables to get ID numbers set like for like?  Or, scrap the project and got to an alternative for web reporting from the vintage access database?
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Question by:VirtualKansas
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by:Jeffrey Coachman
Jeffrey Coachman earned 250 total points
ID: 38745158
We are currently going through a similar scenario.

If this is a standard .mdb file (access 200 format)
...and it is working just fine.
Then I would really suggest moving it up to the .accdb format in order to work smoothly with sharepoint.

But before you think about Sharepoint, you should clearly define what you mean by:
"company is growing and outgrowing access. "


Sharepoint seems like it is maturing, but it is not a simple product to set up. (especially not on the MS Access side.)
Access in sharepoint can be a confusing mix of Web Databases, Workspaces, Sharepoint Lists, Web Forms, Publishing to SP, Saving To SP, Web Forms, ...etc

This all before the confusing mix of steps to actually make the db easily accessible to the end users...


Just my thoughts on this.

Let's see what other experts post...

JeffCoachman
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE) earned 250 total points
ID: 38746676
Ditto Jeff's comments on Sharepoint.

However what I'm wondering is if you have considered moving to Access FE with a SQL server backend.

  There's no limit then on connections or size of the database, and you get to retain virtually all of your code to date just the way it is.

Jim.
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