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Creating a user in Linux with root privliges

Posted on 2013-01-07
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Last Modified: 2013-02-16
Hello,

I have created an admin group called 'admins' and replaced %wheel in sudoers under /etc with this group.. I have created a user 'sysadmin' and added him to the admins group.

As a result of above the 'sysadmin' account is able to execute all commands just like root however, I am not able to write to any of the directories in Linux e.g. /tmp

Are there any additional steps I need to perform??  Please advise.

Thanks
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Question by:fais79
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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 38752208
Are you aware that you (sysadmin) will have to prefix all commands with "sudo" in order to execute them with root privileges?

This includes of course all commands which try to write to a directory.

sudo touch /tmp/testfile

for example.

If you left your sudoers entry at the default "ALL = (ALL) ALL" you must enter your (sysadmin's) password before a command is executed.
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by:fais79
ID: 38752229
Oh ok, I didn't know that!  Is there an alternative and better way of achieving what I am trying to do above??  i.e. creating an alternative user with root privliges allowing to execute all root commands as well as have access to all files folders in Linux.. Just like it can be done by creating a user in Windows and adding to local Administrators group.


Thanks,
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Author Comment

by:fais79
ID: 38752244
I only edited the sudoers file by replacing %wheels with %admins group and didn't change anything else..
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LVL 68

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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 38752245
Yes, that's possible by giving this user the UID "0", but it's not recommended, because it can create a big security risk.

Changes made by this privileged user can in no way be distinguished from those made by the original root user, whereas "sudo" keeps a log of the commands issued so you can at least keep track of these activities.
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Author Comment

by:fais79
ID: 38752262
Thanks for the advice, really appreciate it!

So basically what I have done so far is engough.  I don't have to make any further changes and just need to make sure that my colleague who will be using the sysadmin account uses sudo before all commands??
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Expert Comment

by:woolmilkporc
ID: 38752377
Yes, correct!

And if you (or they) find it annoying having to enter one's password then change

%admins         ALL = (ALL) ALL

to

%admins         ALL = (ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL
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Author Comment

by:fais79
ID: 38752409
The reason I wanted an alternative account so that all the actions are logged so I think I rather leave it at:

%admins         ALL = (ALL) ALL

I will try this tomorrow and update u!

Many thanks,
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Expert Comment

by:Tintin
ID: 38753462
If the user types in

sudo -s

they effectively get a root shell.
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Author Comment

by:fais79
ID: 38753628
Tintin,

I tried sudo -s and it shifts to root shell hence, able to write to all folders which is what I want.  However, how can I log sysadmin's actions which are required for auditing purposes??

Thanks,
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woolmilkporc earned 500 total points
ID: 38753802
Only the "sudo -s" command itself will be logged, nothing else.

By default, sudo uses syslog for logging.
This means that you must have an entry for "auth.info" (or a catch-all) in /etc/syslog.conf.

To protect the generated log against modifications by a local sudo user consider directing it to a remote syslog server.
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