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One Printer, Two V-lans?

Posted on 2013-01-07
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Last Modified: 2013-01-14
Okay so I have a Server 2011 SBS. This has all of our print shares on it.

We have two networks:

Normal: 192.168.20.0 /24  vlan 20
Guest: 192.168.30.0 /24     vlan 30

Printer is on: Normal: 192.168.20.10 vlan 20

I want to share this printer between both of these networks and vlans, so both the guest and normal users can print to it.

We have a Cisco ASA 5510, and cisco 2960 switches.

The Guest network is actually used for on our Aruba wireless network.

I'm a bit of a noob for this, any help?
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Question by:Pancake_Effect
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tpitch-ssemc earned 125 total points
ID: 38752567
I think you'd have to have a printer that supports trunking. I don't know that such a thing exists. Does the printer have a USB or Parallell port? If so, get a Jet Direct (or other print server device) and connect to it via that port. Then you can put the Jet Direct print server on the Guest VLAN.
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by:Neil Russell
Neil Russell earned 125 total points
ID: 38752579
Best solution is to put your Printer on a third VLAN and ensure that Both the other 2 VLANS can talk with that new VLAN.
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by:DLeaver
DLeaver earned 125 total points
ID: 38752601
You could add a static route between the vlans to allow printing traffic to go to the printer and then add an acl to prevent any unauthorized access outside of the printer.
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by:rauenpc
rauenpc earned 125 total points
ID: 38752727
In most cases, the guest vlan is an interface on the 5510, even if all traffic goes through another device like a wireless controller. The most simple config method is to give the guest interface a lower security rating than the inside so that, by default, guests cannot access the inside network. The security rating on guest is higher than the outside/internet interface so that they can, by default, access the internet. Usually, when guest needs to access a small portion of the inside network for things like DNS, DHCP, or printers, you would just need to explicitly allow that traffic on the ASA's guest interface. Depending on the OS version on the ASA, you may need to configure a NAT/NONAT to allow the traffic to get through as well. I assume they are, but make sure all printers to be accessed by guest are statically configured.

If you don't know how to configure the ACL and/or NAT, post a scrubbed config of your firewall and we can probably figure out what is needed.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Pancake_Effect
ID: 38774915
Thanks everyone for the feedback. I'm thinking I'm going to talk to our network engineer about it. It seems like the third vlan or the guest network might be the easiest route. Again thanks!
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