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Does anyone know where Microsoft are heading with .net ?

Posted on 2013-01-09
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I’ve been trying to get a grip of where ms are going with .net, with Blend being shut down recently (which we use a lot) I need to come up with answers to my seniors but can’t find any definite answers anywhere.
Are there any websites that can point me in the right direction that anyone knows of ?
I’ve also read that the future of wpf in general is in doubt !  so what’s going to replace it  ???  are we going back to objective C ???

I’ve been searching like Sherlock Holmes over the past 3 days and haven’t come up with much

Thanks in advance,
K.
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Question by:Kinger247
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TommySzalapski earned 668 total points
ID: 38758956
Given that Windows 8 was designed with mobile applications in mind, you can expect the trend to be in that direction elsewhere. Objective C is used on many smart phones, so that may well be where a lot of the focus goes.
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by:Orcbighter
Orcbighter earned 668 total points
ID: 38762232
The simple answer is that Microsoft will support .NET until it doesn't!
Pardon my cynicism, but their history is littered with products that suddenly were no longer supported.

Visual Basic - They modified all their products, especially Office, to have Basic underlying them (Word Basic, Excel Basic). Now the golden child is XML and XAML.

MFC - still part of Visual Studio,, at least up to 2008, but wizard support and code libraries have become harder to find and creating Windows Forms using MFC is now very hard, because it is now all Managed code in .NET (I am not saying its a bad thing, just pointing it out.)

Silverlight - currently supported but Microsoft wants to move to HTML5

I could go on with other examples, but you get the point.
The increasing popularity of .NET probably means that is the way to go, so just write your code, and when they stop supporting it, take a deep breath, sigh, and convert what you have to to the new paradigm.
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by:Volox
Volox earned 664 total points
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If you buy large amounts of Microsoft  software... Windows desktop licenses, server licenses, SQL licenses, and Visual Studio licenses, then you can probably get a little face time with some Microsoft folks.  Just talk with your sales rep about it.  The more you spend the more likely you can talk to people more in the know.

Unfortunately Orcbighter is kind of right, and even talking with Microsoft people won't get you a magic crystal ball.  Sometimes even people high up in MS think that things are going a certain direction and then they change.  The up side to that is that MS doesn't lock into technologies that don't pan out.  The down side is that if you stay at or near the leading edge, you end up having to abandon certain things along the way.

I would say that if you see a technology go big in .Net AND in the Java world, it's probably going to be around for a while - like generics.  If it's V1 of something, then you might want to keep an eye out and not jump on bandwagon right away if you aren't willing to do rework later.
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