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Diskspace For Index Rebuild

Posted on 2013-01-09
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Last Modified: 2013-01-15
Hi ,

How to reduce .mdf file size after Index Rebuild (Offline)  in SQL Server 2005
Before doing index rebuild i changed recovery mode to bulk.
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Question by:spkvijay
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by:Steve Wales
ID: 38758789
To answer your question, I will tell you that the way to shrink a data file in SQL Server is with DBCC SHRINKFILE.

However, just because you CAN do it, doesn't mean you SHOULD do it.

It is generally accepted that running SHRINKFILE on a datafile is a bad idea.  It causes internal file fragmentation and can cause bad performance.

If the file grew to the size it currently is, it obviously needed the space and the next time you perform index rebuilds (if that was the reason the file grew), then it's only going to grow again.

A quick search produced any number of articles on why you shouldn't shrink your datafiles:

http://www.karaszi.com/sqlserver/info_dont_shrink.asp
http://dba.stackexchange.com/questions/17277/when-is-it-ok-to-shrink-a-database
http://ask.sqlservercentral.com/questions/1872/is-using-shrink-bad-for-your-database.html
http://www.brentozar.com/archive/2009/08/stop-shrinking-your-database-files-seriously-now/

(Brent Ozar's post also links to another half a dozen articles from people like Paul Randall, Kimberly Tripp and Tom LaRock saying the same thing).
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Scott Pletcher earned 1500 total points
ID: 38760421
>> the next time you perform index rebuilds (if that was the reason the file grew), then it's only going to grow again <<

Not necessarily.  And index rebuilds do indeed by default use some extra disk space in the db, although much less than in earlier SQL versions (SQL 2000 and before).

I suggest using option SORT_IN_TEMPDB = ON when doing index rebuilds.  I've found it lessens total disk space used in the main db (even more than MS's docs claim it will), and usually makes the rebuilt index more contiguous besides.  It also can help performance, esp. if you have tempdb on a separate disk/raid set.

That option does require that you have enough free space in tempdb to hold the entire index.  That's not normally an issue nowadays, as tempdb is usually large anyway; however, it could prevent an extremely large index from using that option.
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