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How to wire switch for multiple VLANS?

Posted on 2013-01-09
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Last Modified: 2016-11-23
I hope this doesn't get to complicated but here goes nothing. I just acquired 6 dell servers each with 2 ethernet ports, and a remote access port. I also have a cisco business class router capable of VLANS, and a Netgear 24 port switch that is also capable of VLANS. What I want to know is the proper way to wire the 3 of them so that each server has its own VLAN and then I am using one to one NAT to assign WAN IP's to each ethernet on all the servers. I want to create separate VLANS like this. Example A: Create a VLAN on the cisco router using just port 1. Then create a VLAN on the Netgear switch using ports 1-4. I would then run a cat5e patch cable from port 1 of the Cisco router to port 1 of the Netgear router. Then use ports 2 and 3 to go to the 2 ethernet ports on the server. And lastly port 4 to the remote access port on the server. I would then duplicate this configuration with ports 5-8, 9-12 and so on. then I would I would connect my computer to the switch on port 25. Lastly I would create one more VLAN with ports 25, 1, 5, 9, 13, and so on. that way my computer could connect to all the VLANS. Ok I hope you are still following me because here is the actual question. Could I instead do this while maintaing all servers being on separate VLANS. Example B: I was thinking about running 1 patch cord from the router to the switch and put it on say port 25. Then create VLANS like this. VLAN 1 would be ports 1,2,3 and 25. VLAN 2 would be ports 4,5,6 and 25. VLAN 3 would be ports 7,8,9 and 25. That way they are all separate of each other but still connected to the router that is on port 25. Or would this defeat the purpose of the VLANS because they would all be on the same LAN then? Or if you have another completely better and correct way I should wire it please feel free to add the info. I want to make sure there are no bottle necks for bandwidth as well. Thanks.
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Question by:cbruinooge2
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rauenpc earned 500 total points
ID: 38761543
This situation is called router on a stick. When doing router on a stick, it is most common to configure the router with sub interfaces on a single physical interface. Each sub interface will have the corresponding vlan defined. On the switch, each vlan needs to be defined. One port will be set to tag all vlans - this would commonly be called trunk or dot1q link. The tagging keeps the vlans separate when going to or from the router. As to the rest of the switch, pick and choose which vlan to configure on each untangled access port.

Good tutorial.
https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/servlet/JiveServlet/download/5507-2434/Router%20on%20a%20Stick.pdf
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by:giltjr
ID: 38767103
What switches do you have?  Are they both layer 2 only with VLAN support or is one of them layer 3?

If one is layer 3, you don't need to do the router on a stick, you could have the L3 switch do the routing for you.

The advantage of this is that any traffic that needs to be routed never leaves the L3 switch and thus you get a little better performance.

Using a router on a stick mean all routed traffic goes through the router port twice.
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