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MS Access Should I split my database?

Posted on 2013-01-10
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Last Modified: 2013-01-10
I created a database that manages tasks/projects with report and query features.

The database will held on a network share with a max of 4 employee's connected at a given time.

Should I split it?

Any other advice to enhance integrity and avoid corruption?
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Question by:DJPr0
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mbizup earned 500 total points
ID: 38763427
-- >> Should I split it?

Yes.  Any shared database should be split with the users having individual copies of the UI (front-end) and the shared back-end data file residing on a server.

Take a look at this article for tips on avoiding corruption (and note that splitting your database is among those tips):
http://allenbrowne.com/ser-25.html
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LVL 57
ID: 38763453
Absolutely and ditto everything else mbizup said.

Jim.
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LVL 74

Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 38763543
To be sure,
Splitting the database (for evenr *1* user) will always be a good idea.
See here too:
http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/10things/10-reasons-to-split-an-access-database/1119

And to be totally fair, ...yes , ...you can run an UNsplit DB if the number of users is low and the number of users in the DB at any one time will also be low (concurrency)...

*However* there will always exist the possibility of a crash that would not happen if the db was split.

When you Share one Access db file (for lack of a simpler explanation here), the user must pull down the entire app over the network.
This means that another use logging in may not have access to the db if something is open in design view.
It also means that you open yourself up to any number of the "Conflict" errors in Access.

But back to the "crash" scenario, with one user pulling the DB over the network.
Let's say another user logs into the database and is working.
Everything is fine, and neither user has any problems...
Sound great right...?
Sure, until one users machine goes wonky (crashes, Network hiccup, app lock up, Reboot while DB is open, unexpected "terminal" error, ...etc)
Now you have one machine where the DB is "Crashed", and the other where the db "appears" to be working fine.

Well, with one DB file being "shared", it won't be long before the "Good" database starts showing signs of corruption or worse...

Trust me, this all happened to me...
:-(

JeffCoachman
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LVL 74

Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 38763567
And to be fair here,...
I have posted a lot of info above.

But the bottom line is that mbizups post is the answer here.
   "Split the database"
So I do not want any points,...
(honest)
My info was just an illustration of what might happen if you don't split the db.
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Author Closing Comment

by:DJPr0
ID: 38764127
Thanks!

Getting the ax out now.
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