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SNAP type SAN File Server for Visual FoxPro Database

Hi,

I am interested in a NAS/SAN type file server for Visual FoxPro database files. Thsi woudl not be used fro archives, it would be live data in a well tuned VFP DBC that may have 20 very active concurrent users. In the past we have deployed full M$ Windows servers but I am wondering if we really need the Windows server OS and all the other headaches that go along with it?

Any suggestions?
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BobBrink
Asked:
BobBrink
1 Solution
 
chaauCommented:
you do not need a windows server for FoxPro files. Foxpro is not a client-server type of database. It is a file-system database. Basically, any SAMBA-type share would do the trick. You can even keep the database on a Network Disk type of devices, which are currently very cheap
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pcelbaCommented:
NAS devices should work as shared files storage. The obvious problem is Windows compaitiblity in some side areas like file and record locking or oplocks. You may Google FoxPro +oplocks to read more.

You have to test the concurrent data access very cerefully to avoid possible negative surprises...
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Olaf DoschkeSoftware DeveloperCommented:
If you have 20 concurrent users, you typically already use a domain and a windows server merely to have it easier to administrate users. Do you really work in a peer-to-peer network with so many users? We have a company of 5 employees and have a win2008r2 server.

And if you have such a server, you just put your DBC and DBFs there, what's so problematic about a Windows Server?

And if Windows Server is a car, NAS is like a motorcycle or smaller vehicles and SAN is like a truck or larger. In what direction do you really need to go?

Storage Area Network means you have lot's of networked storage servers, with much more capabilities than to add a new network share, network  attached storage merely is such a network share via a small mostly linux based pc serving one or more HDDs.

And you can have your problems with a Linux based NAS, as seen here, for example: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/visualfoxprogeneral/thread/58d0d889-169c-4ff7-a2fc-9bb7e5770983 (not very old).

Turns out the file names can be a root problem, as Windows doesn't allow a file aaa.dbf, when there already is AAA.DBF, but to Linux these are two different file names and files. And that can easily bite you. Eg I simply think of PACK creating new files. IIRC it creates all upper case names, but if the original file is lower case PACK will actually create a secondary file not replacing the original. So, at least you need to make sure you can configure the case sensitivity of the NAS. And as most certainly the file system used will not be FAT nor NTFS, you will most certainly have compatibility problems with locking, even if you can configure the case sensitivity.

Bye, Olaf.
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