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Multiple PPPoE connections on same router/modem

Hello!

I have a D-Link ADSL2 modem / router that was connected to my phone line. My DSL provider support PPPoE, and I had this set up correctly in the router. Other devices on my LAN could either use the router's WAN connection to connect to the Internet, or they could use the router to create additional PPPoE connections. For example, I had another router (a Linksys WRT-54GL) connected via Ethernet cable to my D-Link router, and the Linksys was configured to use PPPoE on its WAN port. You could also, for example, connect a PS3 or an Xbox via Ethernet cable to the D-Link router, and configure them to use PPPoE. This worked fine, but my D-Link router started giving me some trouble, which I put down to old age. I then swapped it with a Zyxel modem / router, and my problem now is that the Zyxel router itself will create its own PPPoE connection, but won't let other devices connect using PPPoE.

So, my question is, (a) what is the technology called that my D-Link router has or supports that doesn't seem to be supported by the Zyxel router; and (b) can anyone recommend an alternative router that can handle this, as well as all the options like LAN IP reservation by MAC address, port forwarding, firewall, etc. Basically, something that has all the features of the Tomato firmware, plus ADSL2 support.

Thanks!
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Julian Matz
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Julian Matz
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1 Solution
 
cbmmCommented:
Why do you need more than one device making the ppoe connection?
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Julian MatzAuthor Commented:
Sometimes, there are benefits. For example, it makes it easy to isolate networks. Also good if NAT needs to be bypassed. A router, AFAIK, can only support one DMZ. Using PPPoE, every device with its own connection gets its own public IP address. Just a few examples...
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koudryCommented:
A small diagram to show how your devices are connected, would be a good start. If you have one WAN with one provider going out, it means that the other devices are on your LAN network, obviously using the WAN to get out to the Internet domain. The Internet facing device will provide all the security features.
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Julian MatzAuthor Commented:
I have one WAN with one provider, but I can create multiple outgoing connections on the one DSL line. I don't know if that makes sense, but I suppose it's a bit like having multiple telephone handsets in the house - when a person makes a call, another person, using a second handset, could either listen in on the call on the same line, or make a second outgoing call to someone else. I know it's a little bit different, since this scenario would require two phone lines, but hopefully you get the meaning.

Basically, I have one WAN, but I can create at least 3 separate connections simultaneously, with 3 unique public IP addresses.

I've attached a rough diagram...

Network Diagram
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Julian MatzAuthor Commented:
Is it called PPPoE pass-through, by any chance?
Basically, what I'm looking for is support for multiple PPPoE sessions, through the one router.
Surely it can't be too uncommon since it's an efficient way to get around a double NAT situation when there are multiple routers in play.
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cbmmCommented:
Check and see if your router supports host network binding.
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Julian MatzAuthor Commented:
It is indeed called PPPoE pass-through, and it turns out that my Zyxel router does support it, but it needed to be enabled.

What is "Host Network Binding"?

I'll still be looking for a good router, though. Draytek routers have been mentioned a few times. I wonder are they all good, or are there specific models that are especially better than others. Any others, maybe Linksys?
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cbmmCommented:
Host Network binding:

This is used only if you have multiple PPPoE sessions. Use this to ensure that a particular host always uses the same PPPoE session.
Strict Binding:
Only the bound interface is allowed to send packets for the specified host. If the bound interface is not available, no packet from the specified host can be sent.
Loose Binding:
In normal case, the packets from the specified host will be sent via the bound interface. If the bound interface is not available, the other interfaces are alternative.
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