assign final value based on System.property

I've got a feeling what I'm trying to do is not possible, but I'll ask. I have a final float in an Interface. I want the value of it to be assigned according to a system property.
public interface MyConstants {
    public static final float MY_CONSTANTS = Float.parseFloat(
    		System.getProperty("myConstant").equalsIgnoreCase("2") ? "2.0" : "1.0");
}

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It must be this way, ie in an Interface and a final. So then set the property somewhere in the code:
System.setProperty("myConstant", "2"); // set to not 1

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MY_CONSTANTS always ends up being 0.0. I would have at least expected to always to 1.0. I've got a feeling that this isn't possible because of when the class/interface loading occurs. Basically I'm trying to kluge a #ifdef sort of thing.
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allelopathAsked:
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CEHJConnect With a Mentor Commented:
If you want a default value assigned even when the system property is not set, you could do the following (preferably with code more readable than mine ;))

public interface MyConstants {
    public static final float MY_CONSTANTS = (System.getProperty("myConstant") == null)
        ? 1.0f
        : (System.getProperty("myConstant").equalsIgnoreCase("2") ? 2.0f : 1.0f);
}

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CEHJCommented:
That's fine. Example below. Bear in mind that the property must be set or you'll get an exception

public class Mc implements MyConstants {
    public Mc() {
        System.out.println(MY_CONSTANTS);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Mc();
    }
}

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imladrisConnect With a Mentor Commented:
#ifdef is normally used for "conditional compilation".
That is, they are directives for the compiler to insert the correct/relevant code into the object/executable depending on the intended environment.

So only the code for the intended environment is included in the executable. This will constrain its size but more importantly, allow the same source to be compiled by different compilers for different environments or machines depending on the settings. None of this is normally relevant to Java which runs on a virtual machine.

The most often used other objective is to differentiate between "debug" and "release" code, or something like that. Again, there is a size, and/or performance, issue here.

For this case, however, you could simply set a final variable in the source to specify what you want. Java will not compile anything inside blocks that can't be executed. So, if you write something like:

static final boolean DEBUG=true;

if(DEBUG)
{   check stuff, or log stuff or whatever
}

then that clause will be compiled if DEBUG is set to true, but it won't be compiled if you change DEBUG to be set to false. Just recompile that and then send it on its way.
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krakatoaCommented:
So have you got "this far" then ? :

class MyCons implements MyConstants {

public static void main(String[] args){

System.out.println(MY_CONSTANTS);

}

}

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iface :

public interface MyConstants {
    public static final float MY_CONSTANTS = Float.parseFloat(
    		System.getProperty("java.version").equalsIgnoreCase("2") ? "2.0" : "1.0");
}

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krakatoaCommented:
Sry CEHJ - my clocks are running slow. ;)
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zzynxSoftware engineerCommented:
>> I want the value of it to be assigned according to a system property.
Why "according to"? Why not just simply assigning it the value of the property like this:

public interface MyConstants {
    public static final float MY_CONSTANTS = Float.parseFloat(System.getProperty("myConstant"));
}

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public class MC implements MyConstants {
    public MC() {
        System.out.println(MY_CONSTANTS);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.setProperty("myConstant", "2.0"); // You probably won't set this here of course. Just to prove it works.
        new MC();
    }
}

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allelopathAuthor Commented:
imlandris:
Thanks for the explanation. So then, I'm not trying to emulate a #ifdef.

What I am trying to do is have MY_CONSTANTS have a default of 1 (if the property value is not specified) or get its valued from a system property if that system property is defined. My apologies to those who responded if I was not clear. In this case, the solution by zzynx is not what I need because a value must be specified for the system property.
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zzynxConnect With a Mentor Software engineerCommented:
>> What I am trying to do is have MY_CONSTANTS have a default of 1 (if the property value is not specified) or get its valued from a system property if that system property is defined

OK. This is the updated code then:

public interface MyConstants {
    public static final float MY_CONSTANTS = Float.parseFloat(System.getProperty("myConstant")==null ? "1.0" : System.getProperty("myConstant"));
}

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CEHJCommented:
:)
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zzynxSoftware engineerCommented:
Thanx 4 axxepting
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