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Do I need a motherboard standoff for an asus mb p8z77-m and corsair 300r

Posted on 2013-01-12
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Last Modified: 2013-01-17
I have a corsair 300r case and a motherboard asus p8z77-m motherboard that came with 10 motherboard screws and no motherboard standoff screws.  My question is does this combination of case and motherboard require a standoff.  If it requires a standoff where does it go ?  A px would help..

I emailed corsair and they said it only requires 8 screws since it is an m-atx...but they seemed confused on what a motherboard standoff screw is essentially did not provide an answere, guidance, or diagram.
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Question by:upobDaPlaya
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by:als315
als315 earned 75 total points
ID: 38770178
Here you can see, that you don't need additional standoffs (there are "bump" style risers):
http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/4647/corsair_carbide_series_300r_mid_tower_case_review/index5.html
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by:Michael-Best
Michael-Best earned 75 total points
ID: 38770180
Standoff screws are used to raise the motherboard above the case so that the motherboards soldered parts do not contact the case and also to provide a good ground from the motherboard to the case. They are normally part of the screw that come with the case (some new cases use raised parts formed into the case tray for the same purpose)
Otherwise your need to buy them and use them for every motherboard to case mounting screw.

http://www.hardwareheaven.com/articleimages/buildapc_2009/MOBO_STANDOFFS.jpg

http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg220/bdrem1/Parts/Standoff/STANDOFFM3Alarge-10-2-BD.jpg
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by:garycase
ID: 38770381
You ALWAYS need to use standoffs when mounting a motherboard -- that's what "holds" the motherboard up so it doesn't short against the case.     However, the Corsair case you're using has SOME of these standoffs built-in in the form of the elevated "bumps" you can see in the case, so it should have come with screws that fit the threads in these "bumps".    You don't need the riser screws that are usually used (the ones shown in the 2nd link in Michael-Best's post above.

Your board has 8 locations for standoffs => 3 across the top;  3 across the middle; and 2 near the bottom of the board.    I can't tell for sure from the picture of the case whether or not there are "bumps" at all 8 locations -- it appears the bottom locations may just be holes designed for additional standoffs => if that's so, the case should have come with a couple of riser screws; but if there are indeed "bumps" at all 8 locations then you don't need additional standoffs.

There's a very simple test:   Before you populate the board or insert the ATX cover plate in the case, just put the board in place (one of the pre-installed standoff "bumps" has a pin that helps hold the board in place), and see if all 8 of the holes are over a "bump".    If so, you're good to go.     From the picture of the case, it LOOKS like the 8th standoff does not have a "bump", so you'll need a riser screw.    The rest seem to be okay.

With the ATX panel facing left, here's how I'm counting the standoff locations:

1              2       3




4              5       6

7
                 8
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LVL 70

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by:garycase
ID: 38770418
... Note:   As long as 1-7 have the appropriate "bumps", there's no problem mounting the board, although it'd be best if there was a bit of support under #8 as well.    You said it didn't include any standoff screws, but look carefully to see if there may have been a small riser that would push into the hole at position 8 -- it may not be a traditional riser screw.
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by:
garycase earned 275 total points
ID: 38770447
I was looking at the most detailed pictures I could find on this board -- in a video on Corsair's site;  and they clearly do not have a "bump" at position 8 ==> the video shows a riser screw installed at that location.    Does your case have the screw pre-installed?   (if not, is it in the hardware package?)

Here's a picture I took from the video that clearly shows the riser at postion #8:

Corsair 300 Standoff Picture
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Author Comment

by:upobDaPlaya
ID: 38771087
Hi garycase...

See attached px

I did as you suggested..good suggestion.  there are no bumps for 7 and 8...they are both flat.  I suppose this makes sense as my  mATX  motherboard does not extend beyond holes 7 and 8 on the attached px.

In any event we went to the stiore to purchase standoffs.  We sound 2 available:
1st product available-6-32 Brass MB Standoffs for ATX Computer Case (Made by StarTech.com)
Second Product Available-6-32 to M3 MB Standoff  (Made by StarTech.com)

Which one do I use ?  The second product seems just a tiny bit shorter (length) then the first product available...
standoff.jpg
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by:garycase
ID: 38771252
I'm surprised Corsair doesn't include a couple of standoffs in the package, since the case is advertised as compatible with both ATX and micro-ATX boards => and any micro-ATX board will need standoffs at positions 7 & 8.    [and the case clearly has holes in the necessary locations for mounting the standoffs]

It's hard to say for certain, but I'm fairly sure the standoffs "for ATX Computer Case" is what you need.

Get the standoffs;  screw 2 of them in to positions 7 & 8;  then do as I suggested earlier again => put the motherboard in place and confirm that everything looks/feels good.   You're then ready to take the motherboard out;  install the CPU and heatsink;  install the ATX panel in the case;  and then mount the motherboard.    Note that when you install the motherboard with the ATX panel in place, you have to be sure the grounding tabs go in the right places  [pay close attention and you'll see where they go).    Once its in place, screw it down into the standoffs, and the toughest part of the build is done.
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by:garycase
ID: 38771259
... by the way, it's good that you're asking plenty of questions to be sure you're ready for this build;  but don't be overly stressed about the process.    It's really VERY simple as long as you take your time and are VERY cautious and static-sensitive when handling the motherboard and (especially) the CPU.

Once you have the CPU and heatsink mounted and the motherboard installed, the rest will be quite simple;  and once you have the basics done [power supply; front panel cables;  SSD mounted and connected to a SATA port; and DVD installed and connected;  the actual installation of Windows 7 will be VERY simple (you'll be surprised).    With an SSD, you'll be running Windows 7 less than 30 minutes after you start the install :-)
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by:garycase
ID: 38771264
.. a word on static protection.      If you install the power supply first, you can plug it in; but leave it turned off -- and then the metal part of the case will be an EXCELLENT ground.  [Since the entire case is now grounded to the utility company ground]

Then, while sitting at your workspace, you need only touch the case for a couple seconds before you handle any static-sensitive parts and you'll be just fine.    If you're also using an anti-static wrist strap, just connect it to any metalic part of the case.
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by:als315
ID: 38771295
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by:nobus
nobus earned 75 total points
ID: 38771383
a simple test for the fact if you need motherboard standoffs is just installing the I/O connector plate, then sliding the mobo in
if the connecters line up with your holes in the plate, it should be fine (regarding height), and you only may need  standoffs for the 2 last ones
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by:garycase
ID: 38771418
Good suggestion nobus -- but a bit late to the party  :-)

Posted on 2013-01-12 at 12:33:04:     "... There's a very simple test:   ...  just put the board in place ..."

Posted on 2013-01-12 at 21:37:16:    "... Hi garycase...  I did as you suggested..good suggestion.  there are no bumps for 7 and 8...they are both flat. "
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by:nobus
ID: 38771462
i must have read your mind...lol
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Author Comment

by:upobDaPlaya
ID: 38772086
Oops my bad...I strictly took a look at the case instruction manual which illustrated the screws that came with the package and it definitely does not display a standoff screw.  After being repeatedly asked if I received a standoff screw I finally went to the bag of screws and sure enough there is 1 stand-off screw !  Out of curiousity why would Corsair only supply 1 standoff screw if screws are needed for 7 and 8 ?

Per your suggestions above I will put standoffs in 7 and 8 (note I have a 15 pack of standoff screws that I picked up from Micro Center last night so I have a plent supply :)...) and place the motherboard over the holes and see if it is a good fit...

My only concern last night was when I took out the mb and tested the holes I had no static guard on and I am hopeful I did not compromise the mb...I like garycase suggestion of installing the psu to minimize any static issues, but based on how I handled it last night would there be any concern I ruined the mb...
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by:als315
ID: 38772196
If you don't touch your cat before, you should have no problems with static. Memory modules are more sensitive, but I've no problems with static many years
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by:nobus
ID: 38772276
>>   Out of curiousity why would Corsair only supply 1 standoff screw if screws are needed for 7 and 8 ?   <<  ask Corsair, onley they know it

 >>  I had no static guard on  << did you touch the case ( = earth) before ?  as Gary said?  that takes most charges off (distributes them equally )
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by:Michael-Best
ID: 38772337
As suggested you may need standoff screws where the case has no elevated bumps and also short standoff screws if the elevated bumps are too low....
The motherboard must be flat and parallel to the case with no chance of shorting or an electrical arc to the case.
You may need to use multiple sized standoff screws to level the motherboard.
If there is no conversion kit for your motherboard to fit your case then you need to select standoff screws to level your motherboard.
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by:garycase
ID: 38772603
They may have modified the case design somewhere along the way and removed one of the "bumps" from position 7  (one of the pictures at the Corsair site looks like there's a "bump" at 7).     But what matters is how it's made now -- if both 7 & 8 are flat, then you should install standoffs there.

It's not llikely you did any static damage when handling the motherboard.    Walking on a carpeted floor;  petting a pet (cat or dog);  etc. can generate a LOT of static in the dry winter months -- but as long as you ground yourself well before handling the components you're okay.     Note that simply touching the case helps some;  but it's not nearly as good as touching the case with a plugged in power supply unit, since the case itself isn't grounded unless there's a good path to an earth ground.

In any event, by far the most static-sensitive component you have to handle is the CPU => so be SURE you're well-grounded before installing that.    Memory is also fairly sensitive, but not nearly so much as the CPU or the chipset components on the motherboard.
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Author Comment

by:upobDaPlaya
ID: 38791067
Per nobus I did tall to Corsair and they said the following:

FOr that case with that motherboard you will need to put the standoff in the hole right below the alignment standoff in the center. That should be more than enough support for that board and a large GPU. Thank you and please let us know if you have any other questions or concerns.

There is an extra standoff that comes with the accessories that you can use to screw into the hole below the +. You can also remove the lower standoffs too.
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Author Closing Comment

by:upobDaPlaya
ID: 38791347
Thanks for all the informative replies and guidance.  Thanks for the pictures, links, and prompting (nobus asked to give Corsair a jingle..)..Much appreciated..
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by:nobus
ID: 38791986
tx for feedback Da Playa
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