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PC overclocked

Posted on 2013-01-12
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Last Modified: 2013-01-28
I am building my PC for the first time and I heard about overclocking. What is it? Do I need to do it?

My motherboard is ASUS P8Z77-V PRO LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with CPU Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 3000 BX80623I72600K.

I plan to get those from newegg.

Thanks
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Question by:biggynet
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Darr247 earned 200 total points
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With a quad-core CPU that fast, plus threading, no...  you shouldn't need to overclock it.
Overclocking makes more heat, uses more power, and can cause premature failure, not to mention extra hangs, blue screens and general instability.
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by:garycase
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Overclocking refers to running components (whether it's the CPU, memory, GPU, or any other component) at clock speeds in excess of their designed values.
I do NOT recommend it ... although many folks like to do this.    For reliability, components are designed with some leeway in their clock speeds, so a minor variance won't cause failures.    Overclocking essentially "pushes" these limits to see just how fast a component can be run without failing.

But doing this reduces reliability;  generates more heat;  can cause premature failure;  and in my opinion adds little to the performance of a system.    If you want more performance, buy a faster CPU :-)

You'll get a FAR better performance improvement in a modern system by using an SSD for your primary hard drive than you will by pushing the clock speeds up a bit.
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by:biggynet
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How do you overclock the components? Is it automatic or you need a software to push the system to overclock? Thx
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by:garycase
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You change certain settings in the BIOS -- the clock frequency, the CPU multiplier, etc.    Your BIOS has to support manually setting these, but most modern systems do allow at least some modication of these parameters [Yours not only allows this;  but Asus ships a utility you can run under Windows that makes it easy to make these changes].

If you're planning to do this, then be sure you buy a CPU from Intel's "k" series.    e.g. the i7-3770k would be an excellent choice for overclocking.    The "k" series have unlocked multipliers;  so you can easily overclock by simply changing the multiplier.     Remember, however, that overclocking is stressing the components and generating additional heat, so be sure you have excellent airflow in the chassis, and I'd recommend using a 3rd party heatsink that provides better cooling than the stock Intel unit that comes with the CPU.    The Noctua is an excellent choice if you want to overclock:   http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835608018
... or for really serious overclocking you can go with a water-cooled system:   http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835106190


As I noted earlier, however, I do NOT recommend overclocking.    Minor gains in performance at the cost of reduced system stability;  more heat; and a shorter system lifespan.    Modern Ivy Bridge CPU's have PLENTY of power !!       There IS one area where overclocking has been very well implemented:   many high-end graphics cards use overclocked GPUs to squeeze the last little bit of performance out of these processors.    But in those cases, the overclocking setup is part of the DESIGN of the cards -- so they've already got the appropriately larger heatsinks; larger/higher-speed fans;  and in most cases thermal sensors that automatically reduce the speeds if the system overheats.    But unless you're a high-end gamer who needs to squeeze very possible FPS out of your gaming system, you simply don't need this level of performance.    [Gamers often pay between $400 and $1000 for video cards -- and often buy 2 of them to combine in an SLI or Crossfire configuration.]
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by:biggynet
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"Yours not only allows this;  but Asus ships a utility you can run under Windows that makes it easy to make these changes]." You meant this motherboard, ASUS P8Z77-V PRO LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

I am not sure if I will never use overclocking. But I plan to get this, COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus RR-B10-212P-G1 "Heatpipe Direct Contact" Long Life Sleeve 120mm CPU Cooler Compatible with Intel 1366/1155/775 and AMD FM1/FM2/AM3+  for the CPU. This should be good. Correct?

The one that you recommend is if I want to overclocking, http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835608018. Correct?
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by:biggynet
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So is ASUS the best motherboard manufacturer in the market currently?
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by:Darr247
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The nice thing about the larger fans like on the Noctua NH-D14 is they don't have to turn as fast to move the same amount of air, so they are generally quieter.  That's also an advantage of the liquid-cooling setups even if you're not overclocking... they are typically quieter than air-cooled-only systems. The disadvantage of the larger heatsinks/fans is there's no guarantee they'll clear all the components in your case, which is often not a problem with the liquid-cooling, since many come with external radiators, which can use fans even larger (and quieter) than the 140mm on that Noctua.
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by:biggynet
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It looks like the Noctua NH-D14 does not support Intel i7 core CPU
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by:garycase
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There's no "best" motherboard manufacturer -- but Asus is certainly a good one, as is Gigabye, Intel, MSI, and others.

The Noctua supports socket 1155 CPU's => why do you think it won't work with a Core i7 ??
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by:biggynet
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by:Darr247
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I see Intel under the Noctua on that comparison page.
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by:garycase
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It shows "Intel LGA1366 / 1156 / 1155 / 775" under Noctua.    The Core i7 you're looking at is a Socket 1155 processor.
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