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OS Partition is D: instead of C:

Posted on 2013-01-14
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Last Modified: 2013-01-14
I've ran into this a few times but it never mattered until now.

I took a vista computer and installed Windows 7. During the install I deleted all partitions except for the OEM recovery partition. Apparently the Recovery partition was assigned the letter C and the partition containing the OS is drive D:.

How can I fix this to where the OS is drive C:, and How can I prevent this from happening in the future?
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Question by:rbudj
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by:mds-cos
ID: 38775202
I've run into this too, and am replying only so that I can get copied on answers.
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by:Thomas Grassi
ID: 38775265
Boot into safe mode and run disk manager and change drive letters
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ded9 earned 500 total points
ID: 38775272
If you boot to desktop you will see the proper C drive..

If you are booting from the oem disc to troubleshoot any boot related issue then the C drive will show as D drive.

There is nothing wrong with this setup.




Ded9
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Expert Comment

by:garycase
ID: 38775667
Unfortunately you can't change the drive letter for the system partition with Disk Manager.

There ARE ways to do this, but it requires a LOT of tedious registry changes;  and if you miss anything some things may not always work correctly.    By far, the best alternative is to bite the bullet and reinstall Windows.

How to ensure the system partition is assigned C: depends on the position of the recovery partition.

=>  If the Recovery Partition is towards the end of the disk (most typical), you can simply CREATE a partition for the install at the beginning of the disk;  then have the installer use that partition.    The first partition encountered will be C: -- so that will resolve this.

=>   If the Recovery Partition is at the beginning of the disk, it's more complex.   There are a variety of ways to do it, but the two simplest approaches are:

(1)   a.  Image the Recovery Partition
       b.  Create a partition after the recovery partition for the install
       c.  Delete the Recovery Partitition
       d.  Install Windows
       e.  Restore the Recovery Partition from your image.

or

(2)   a.  Disconnect the disk
        b.  Install another empty/new disk
        c.  Install Windows, limiting the partition size to what's available on the original disk.
        d.  Reconnect the original disk
        e.  Clone the partition to the original disk

Perhaps a more compelling question is why you bothered to keep the recovery partition.    I'd just image this, and save the image.    Then delete it and install Windows.    If for any reason you ever wanted to wipe the disk and restore to factory, you can simply restore the recovery image => this also has the advantage that you're protected from disk failures; as you can restore it to any disk.
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Author Closing Comment

by:rbudj
ID: 38775867
You are correct. After being able to boot into the OS, the OS is listed as the C: drive. I thought this might be like in the past where it was different. Thank you.
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by:McKnife
ID: 38775884
Right, if you wanted to keep the vista recovery partition, you should have made an image copy of it and then have it deleted.

Right now you can't do anything. The commonly known registry change (mounteddevices) is not applicable here as the system drive letter was d: from the very start. Sorry, start from scratch.

Edit: ok, I see you just accepted a solution. So it was a non-issue all the way? :)
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