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Internet Explorer Cannot display the Webpage while trying to access webmail

A user since last Thursday cannot access RWW or OWA and is being faced with "Internet Explorer Cannot Display the Webpage"

You can work around this by running as administrator.  Unfortunately, I cannot set this in the shortcut properties.

Firefox runs fine as well.

I am assuming IE, run as a normal user, cannot access the trusted certificate which is in the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store.

I have tried removing certificates and reimporting but this has not worked.
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fuzzyfreak
Asked:
fuzzyfreak
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1 Solution
 
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
could also be malware.. scan with malwarebytes.  Try running ie with no addons and see if that fixes the problem.. if it does then you know that it is an addon that is causing the problem
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fuzzyfreakAuthor Commented:
Not sure how it could be malware when it works running as an administrator.
No-addons does not work.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
If it were a certificate error, IE would actually say so on the "cannot display Webpage" screen. The smaller print would identify this.

What version of IE are you using?
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fuzzyfreakAuthor Commented:
9
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Then you can turn on the developer tools and use the network tab to actually see what is happening under the hood. That'd be where I'd start.
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fuzzyfreakAuthor Commented:
I gave the colleague her laptop back and told her to use Firefox instead.  So until she brings it back in, I won't be able to continue diagnosing this issue.

Thanks for the feedback.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
You cannot reproduce the problem with IE9 on another machine?!? If that is the case, I would definitely suspect malware and letting that laptop out in the wild could be a significant security risk if this user is accessing company resources with it.
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fuzzyfreakAuthor Commented:
Having used and relied on Malwarebytes for a few years, I trust that if it tells me there is no malware, then there is no malware.  Besides, this is not malware behaviour.

Read this article - http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-GB/smallbusinessserver/thread/a652593c-c241-4e90-bbd0-1408afecce92

This is my exact issue but the fix described at the bottom did not help me.
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fuzzyfreakAuthor Commented:
My apologies, I realise I did not actually state that I ran Malwarebytes already.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Actually malware acting as a proxy would exhibit *exactly* that behavior and I've seen it multiple times.

I am not bashing Malwarebytes. But the honest truth is malware increasingly encrypts itself using a random seed so no signature scans can detect it. A good AV program can *prevent* an infection because the malware has to decrypt itself when it is loading in memory and an AV product can pounce and kill the process. But if a zero-day exploit were to be used where there was no signature yet...say the recent Java exploit...then the machine could be infected and once infected no malware scanner, not even malwarebytes, can detect the threat. The problem is that the malware now controls the OS and can lie to the scanner at the API level, completely disguising itself.

This is security 101 stuff. Basic laws of computer security. If your box has been infected, you can't trust that it is ever clean. Ultimately it is your network and thus your decision, but if it were me, "use firefox" would not be an acceptable answer for a potentially infected machine.

I have seen IT Professionals lose their job because they were too casual about their security and my firm got called in and had to rebuild a domain infrastructure due to that lack of judgment. Most IT Pros will lose their job if their employer (or client) gets a $20k bill that could've been easily avoided.

 I've seen companies get sued for privacy, HIPAA compliance, and seen those companies lose because the prosecution was able to prove that the IT Pro did not "adequately" take steps to protect the network. I've been an expert witness in such situations.

In both scenarios, I've seen the businesses themselves fail due to the financial burden that the security exploit caused.

In short, you really have to ask yourself...is that worth it? I can't *make* you take this more seriously. But I sincerely hope you do.
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fuzzyfreakAuthor Commented:
I ran a virus scan and a SAS scan as well. I noticed that on the 12th, the Office 2007 compatibility pack was installed, so I uninstalled this and tested IE which worked fine, I then reinstalled it and IE still worked fine.
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fuzzyfreakAuthor Commented:
Office Compatibility Pack appeared to be the cause of this issue.
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