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JBOD disk and SAN

Posted on 2013-01-17
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we have a SAN storage with RAID5 config, The storage has the features for JBOD.
As i understand the JBOD is a disk.
what will happen when we attach JBOD?
That is, will that part of the RAID5 and expand the srorage with RAID5 config?
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Question by:pdsmicro
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by:Ernie Beek
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JBOD = Just a Bunch Of Disks
So a couple of disks that are represented as one storage volume with the size of the combined separate disks. If one of the disks fail, you loose alle the data that is on it (!)
On RAID5, if one disk failes you can replace it and the volume will be rebuild so no data loss.

So, do you really want to have data on a NAS with JBOD?
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by:pdsmicro
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My question is that will the jbod will be rebuilt as part of the RAID5 to give fault tolerance  or separate volume as a DISK?
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by:Ernie Beek
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Not quite sure what you mean. When setting up a SAN (or NAS or whatever) you can choose how to set up the disks that are in it. So JBOD, RAID5, RAID6, etc. You can't attach a JBOD because it is a concept.
So I am assuming you want to insert some extra disks in to your SAN and expand the RAID5 to cover all the disks in the SAN?
If so, that should be possible, depends on the make/model how to do that. And of course, first make a backup of your data to be safe ;)
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by:andyalder
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Do you mean you are going to add a JBOD enclosure to your current SAN storage box? In that case the controllers in the SAN storage deal with RAID just the same as they deal with any internal disks, you may be able to add the disks to the current array or it may be better to create another one. Need more info on what kit you have in order to be more help.
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Without more data on the SAN system, its hard to determine what the "jbod feature" entails. In one context, it means that the SAN will present each jbod spindle as an individual disk; this may be ideal when using an intelligent file system "on top" of the SAN (like ZFS).

In another context, it means that it will create an array of disks, but use them --without any sort of failure protection-- in sequence: fill one before using the next. This allows you to mix-and-match drive sizes with impunity, but if any one (used) disk in the chain goes bad, the whole volume is lost (just like raid0). It also has the negative of being little faster than a single disk.

In either case, however, any disks in these "jbod" scenarios are completely independent of any data protection schemes available in the array; they will not be impacted by rebuilds and are not available for use (as hot spares, etc) in the protected volume(s).

A final case is that you have the ability to attach any arbitrary collection of disks (eg, a tray of SAS disks or a set of SATA disks accessed through a multi-port concentrator) for the array to use for expansion. Once those disks are added to the system, you then have the option to incorporate them into protected volumes just like the array's internal disks. This is possible on many systems, but its exceedingly rare for the capability to be marketed as a "jbod feature."
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by:pdsmicro
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thank you
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