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Migrating XP to 7 or 8

Posted on 2013-01-17
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Last Modified: 2013-01-17
Hi,

This is related to migrating computers (Desktops and laptops) From windows XP. It would be migrated to windows 7 or Windows 8. I am still confused that many people (experts) seem to recommend to Windows 7 (not 8).

My Questions:

1)      At this time, why is it better to migrate to Windows 7 (than Windows 8)? Please provide the reasons (any reason is appreciated)
2)      What do you think or expect I will face if I migrate directly from XP to 8?

Thank you

tjie
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Question by:tjie
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Erik Bjers earned 180 total points
ID: 38787520
1) Windows 8 is a drastically new user interface and without third party tools like Classic Shell you will find that most users will not be able to efficiently adjust to it.  I put Windows 8 on my computer and find it very difficult to use the new interface

2) If you are planing on upgrading existing computers from XP to Windows 8 you may find that there is no or limited driver support for the computers in 8

3) Windows 8 is a very new operating system and it is unlikely to be adopted in mass by companies for many years, stick with Windows 7 which is a proven OS and has had most of the bugs fixed.

4) Most of the big corporate anti-virus companies have not released a product to support Windows 8 yet, and you may run into this issue with other software vendors

5) Windows 8 is great if you have a tablet or touch screen, not if you want to use a mouse and keyboard

I can not comment on a direct migration from XP to 8 as I have not attempted this or done any research into it though based on past OS releases from MS I am guessing you will not be able to upgrade XP to 8 but would need to do a fresh install (I recommend a fresh install anyway).

eb
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by:TunerML
TunerML earned 50 total points
ID: 38787526
I have seen a a lot of statements thrown both in support of Windows 8 and to continue maintaining a Windows 7 environment. Personal opinions are just that. I myself initially doubted Windows 8 but through use have grown to appreciate it. If I were migrating a client from Windows XP right now my choice would be Windows Server 2012 coupled with Windows 8 workstations. The lack of a traditional desktop is a non-issue as a simple key-combination [Winkey+D] I believe displays a desktop. People I believe do not like drastic changes, and the intial interface presented with Windows 8 is just that. A little use will get anyone quite familiar with it in very short order. It does however have a tablet feel to it, but I believe personally since my use (most of which has been with traditional non-touch desktop workstation), that the new key-combination and UI is very friendly and easy to use. The fact that no one will dispute is Windows 8 performs better on existing hardware.
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by:Stelian Stan
Stelian Stan earned 50 total points
ID: 38787535
First thing to check is if all the applications running on Windows Xp are compatible with Windows 7 or 8.

Once you are ready you can use Windows Easy Transfer: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-CA/windows7/products/features/windows-easy-transfer

Regarding Windows 7 or 8 debate have a look on this EE: http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Windows/XP/Q_27957378.html#a38660614

I'm running Windows 8 for more then 4 months now and I like it.
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by:Thomas Grassi
Thomas Grassi earned 50 total points
ID: 38787537
1. Windows 7 is far more stable than Windows 8. Anytime a new OS arrives you can expect to have issues. I my opion Windows 7 was the best OS Microsoft came out with at this point.

2. Depends going with 64 Bit or 32 bit? 64 bit provides you with access to more memory than 32 bit.
Applications can be a problem going to a new OS
Hardware also.
Run this for windows 7
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/downloads/upgrade-advisor
Run this for windows 8
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/upgrade-to-windows-8

This will tell you if your computer hardware or software will have an issue on the new OS
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by:R. Andrew Koffron
R. Andrew Koffron earned 50 total points
ID: 38787604
for my 2 cents, stick with XP if you can(being if your machines came with XP the load from 7 or 8 will likely end you up with a bunch of computers drastically underpowered and with driver issues), if you have to upgrade a business machine windows 7 seems a far better choice at this time.
I once heard someone say "Microsoft will never make a product that does not suck on the first version, unless they try and build a Vacuum cleaner"  at least wait for a service pack or two.
So far in My experience windows8's interface is like a big cell phone, it's difficult to navigate, unreliable, and HIGHLY prone to weird memory leaks, and issues with memory being allocated and never released.  it's very cool on touch screens but annoying as hell in a business.
Needless to say, I'm not a windows 8 fan at all.
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by:Erik Bjers
Erik Bjers earned 180 total points
ID: 38787665
Harel66,

Windows is turning 12 years old later this month and MS will only support it until Apr 2014.  It is an old outdated operating system and I would disagree with you on sticking with XP.  As long as the computer was made in the last 3 - 4 years it should be fine to support Windows 7, and if the computers are older than 3 - 4 years then they are at the end of the expected life time for a client computer and should be replaced.

eb
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by:ded9
ded9 earned 50 total points
ID: 38787683
Run the upgrade advisor and first find out whether your hardware and software are compatible with windows 8 .

If your systems are more than 3 years old ...then not recommend to upgrade to 8

If they are compatible then you should migrate to windows 8 and not 7.

The only disappointment is the screen colors used.

You can evaluate it before u buy it

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/windows-8.aspx



Ded9
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by:Lee W, MVP
Lee W, MVP earned 70 total points
ID: 38788329
This is very much an opinion question.  

I'd like to dispute some of ebjers points:
1) Windows 8 is a drastically new user interface and without third party tools like Classic Shell you will find that most users will not be able to efficiently adjust to it. I put Windows 8 on my computer and find it very difficult to use the new interface

I don't have a degree is psychology and I don't think Microsoft completely ignored psychology when they designed the interface.  So saying that "most users will not be able to efficiently adjust to it" is, I think, potentially insulting to most users.  I find if you explain to users what was done and keep things in perspective, most users *I* talk to don't see a problem using it.  People claim "there is no start menu".  Yes there is.  It just fills the screen now.  The Start button is no longer visible on the taskbar, but if you move to the corner where it would have been - guess what - it appears (it even says "Start"!)

2) If you are planing on upgrading existing computers from XP to Windows 8 you may find that there is no or limited driver support for the computers in 8
I definitely agree with this.  Driver support isn't great.  It hasn't been since Vista.  Got better in 7, but still wasn't fantastic.  And 8 is probably in between 7 and Vista in terms of support, at least for what I've found.  So definitely agree that if you were thinking of upgrading an older computer, while the performance could be pretty good, there is a reasonably high chance you'll have SOME unsupported hardware you cannot find drivers for.

3) Windows 8 is a very new operating system and it is unlikely to be adopted in mass by companies for many years, stick with Windows 7 which is a proven OS and has had most of the bugs fixed.
Windows 8 is based on the same code as 7.  Which is based on the same code as Vista.  Which is based on the same code as XP.  Which is based on the same code as 2000.  Which is based on the same code as NT.  There are changes all along the way and every "fix" to code or addition has the potential to inject new bugs (joke: What's the definition of a service pack?  Take old bugs out, put new ones in - holds true for patches too.  But they've gotten much better over the years and for every new bug, they probably squash 10 or more these days... so its definitely worth patching and upgrading from that standpoint).

4) Most of the big corporate anti-virus companies have not released a product to support Windows 8 yet, and you may run into this issue with other software vendors
haven't experienced this.  However, with ANY upgrade - personal or corporate - you SHOULD be looking over your software and confirming it will work with the new operating system.  ESPECIALLY businesses thinking they are going to migrate the entire office/company.  There CAN be compatibilities and performing due diligence to ensure your critical software runs is vital.  Whether that's to test it on a test machine or in a VM or call the vendor and ask "does your product work on Windows 8" and if not, when/what version does

5) Windows 8 is great if you have a tablet or touch screen, not if you want to use a mouse and keyboard
This sentiment is oft repeated.  And quite probably true about the tablets (haven't used one yet).  But if you keep things in perspective, the new start menu is hideous and the colors and icons are bland and otherwise awful, but other than that, it works just like Windows 7, only faster in my opinion.  

Written from my Windows 8 Desktop with Mouse, Keyboard, and 4 non-touchscreen monitors
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by:Erik Bjers
Erik Bjers earned 180 total points
ID: 38788382
Hello Leew,

I personally use Windows 8 with Classic Shell and have not had any problems with it on hardware that was built to support Windows 8.  Conversely I support a vast array of users in the US and in locations all over the world, and I have had many of them ask me how do I get back to the old look when they buy new computers that came with Windows 8.

I agree that with time the new interface is useable, but MS should not have just forced it on us in the new OS as many users will have difficulty adjusting.  I think it would have been nice of MS to give us an option to use either interface (metro or something like win 7) however I believe their objective was to have a unified OS interface across mobile devices and computers.

BTW I played with the ASUS and the Samsung tablets running 8RT and found them responsive and easy to use, though I still prefer Android.
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 38788768
I know of the Classic Shell / Start Menu options out there... they might make things a little easier - the problem is that they are NOT included with Windows.  It's good to know of them...even recommend them... but I have to support end users who may not have them and companies that may have strict(er) policies that don't allow them.  So I just use Windows the way it was meant to be used.

I like the argument that it should have been an option to keep the Start Menu... It's a Shell and Linux offers multiple Shells, why couldn't Windows? BUT, there's an argument AGAINST this... and precedent.  Office 2007.  RADICALLY changed the interface and people moaned about that (I was one of them).  But as I used it, I did (generally) find it easier and these days, I really don't hear people complaining about it in Office 2010 or 2013.  I DO NOT think it was the smartest move to force it down people's throught, but that said, if you stop and think about the interface from a usage perspective, for most people, it's a MINIMAL-to-NON Issue.  Or at least it should be.  How often are you in the start menu?  I pin everything I use to the taskbar or use shortcuts on the desktop.  I'm in the Modern UI about 1% of the time... if that... so at the end of the day, it's a minor annoyance, NOT a valid reason (in my opinion to not move to Windows 8).
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by:Erik Bjers
ID: 38788825
I am the opposite, I use the start menu for most everything and only my top 5 or 6 programs are pinned and I like a clean desktop.  I use tool bars on the task bar for folders like documents I access often and I like the organized structure of the start menu.

I find the metro interface just looks cluttered and makes it harder to find things just by looking without using search.

I agree about third party apps and while I have no problem using it on my computer or recommending it to friends who know what they are doing but it would be a bad idea to rely on something like this in a corporate environment.

And while I like Win 8 (it boots in just a couple seconds for one thing) I never advocate moving to the latest OS right away it is released and prefer to wait until at least SP1 for mass adaptation.

eb
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 38789064
I used to be that way - hold off on moving... I was for switching to Vista.  But Vista was sooooo bad, even after SP1, I switched to the Win7 Beta and was MUCH happier.  I also used the Win2000 beta for months back in the day and it was great.  And I've been using Win8 Betas for a while before the release and it was ok (not as good as 7 or 2000, but no where near as bad as Vista RTM.  And it's stable in my opinion with no significant issues.  Exchange 2013 on the other hand, that's AWFUL.  Mostly because it's got ZERO compatibility to start with for prior versions... but now I'm getting WAY off topic...
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by:Erik Bjers
ID: 38789089
Hmm we use Lotus Domino/ Notes so no need to worry about Exchange 2013.  I do have a couple production 2012 server mainly used because they house large amounts of data and 2012 supports deduplication natively.  But as you said a bit off topic.
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Author Comment

by:tjie
ID: 38789744
Thank you very much; especially for Leew and Ebjers; very helpful input and discussion

tjie
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