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BGP Vs MPLS

Posted on 2013-01-18
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If I understand BGP is used mostly by the Service Provide(SP).
it can be used by companies, for instance, if they have 2 primary connections to 2  S.Providers.
BGP then is used to Wrap (I guess) the packets exiting the company and going out on the internet... Though I need someone to shade light on that.

MPLS, is also used by S. Providers, but I guess companies can use it only when they need specific services such as QOS and site to site VPN (different than traditional VPN).

I also need someone to shade light on that.

Any clarification on that will be appreciated.

Thank you in advance.
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Question by:jskfan
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by:Sandeep Gupta
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BGP is a protocol to connect two Autonomos Systems (AS).
Example: an organization or ISP is a single entity and to be distinguised among another organizations. There fore in terms of Networks each organization takes an AS number (we say it public AS).
Now when any two entity want to communicate first thing they exchnage their AS to identify each other...
There is one more term i.e. private AS which can be used by big entities within their domain.

MPLS is a technology which provides method & procedure to manage private networks and to scale up/grow it many folds.

BGP is used along with MPLS ...advanced routing we say MPBGP.

Interent is the cloud of public IPs..use can use bgp here as well.

These topics are very vast ..you need to go thru technical docs to understand more..I just tried to give you a stint in plain english txt.
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by:Don Johnston
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If I understand BGP is used mostly by the Service Provide(SP). it can be used by companies, for instance, if they have 2 primary connections to 2  S.Providers.
Mostly correct. BGP is a routing protocol. Just like RIP, OSPF and EIGRP are routing protocols. But RIP, OSPF and EIGRP are interior routing protocols that are not designed to handle the size of large routing tables... Like the internet with over 400,000 networks. So if you want to not use static routes to route traffic to the internet, you will have to use BGP.

BGP then is used to Wrap (I guess) the packets exiting the company and going out on the internet... Though I need someone to shade light on that.
Nope. No wrapping going on with BGP. It's a routing protocol.

MPLS, is also used by S. Providers, but I guess companies can use it only when they need specific services such as QOS and site to site VPN (different than traditional VPN).
Close. Here's the way I explain it (simply). You know what frame-relay is? Great. Now you know what MPLS is. :-)

MPLS an offering to customers that need to connect their sites together. Many times, the customer has no knowledge of what happens to their traffic once it leave their office... other than it shows up at it's destination. Now some customers are more sophisticated than others. And they may be a bit more involved in the process. But like was previously stated, it's a BIG topic. Cisco, for example, has a 5 day class on implementing MPLS. So there's a lot of details.
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by:Sandeep Gupta
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Hi, donjohnston

I am sorry to interrupt you...I know you know more

BGP is not a routing protocol..for routing we must use any IGP or static routing with BGP.
BGP act as a catalyst for routing.
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by:Don Johnston
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BGP is not a routing protocol

From RFC4271 - A Border Gateway Protocol 4 (BGP-4)



Abstract

   This document discusses the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), which is
   an inter-Autonomous System routing protocol.
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by:Sandeep Gupta
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Exactly...its just a inter AS routing protocol..but not like eigrp, ospf or rip.
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by:Don Johnston
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Exactly...its just a inter AS routing protocol..but not like eigrp, ospf or rip.
Which is what I stated:

BGP is a routing protocol. Just like RIP, OSPF and EIGRP are routing protocols. But RIP, OSPF and EIGRP are interior routing protocols that are not designed to handle the size of large routing tables... Like the internet with over 400,000 networks. So if you want to not use static routes to route traffic to the internet, you will have to use BGP.
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Mysidia earned 100 total points
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BGP is a routing protocol (yes).  MPLS is not a routing protocol. BG can be used in or between MPLS routers.

"If I understand BGP is used mostly by the Service Provide(SP). it can be used by companies, for instance, if they have 2 primary connections to 2  S.Providers."

These are the situations where BGP would be most commonly used.  BGP is designed  for inter-domain routing:  some policy and filtering mechanisms are provided, that are not available with other routing protocols.

BGP is also sometimes called EBGP when used externally, and IBGP when used inside an AS.       You should have separate routing protocols for Internal routing inside your network, versus external routing  between networks.

IBGP is not an efficient option for an internal routing protocol.
OSPF/EIGRP/ISIS  are not secure or safe options for routing traffic between another organization's network.

In many cases, small networks with only one upstream provider will not require BGP,   because  the ISP provides the IP addresses, and a  static default route is sufficient.

BGP is generally required for ISPs and multi-homing,  where there is a need to manage which link traffic to certain IP addresses will arrive at,  Eg,  to provide failover in case of link issues,  or to distribute  more load of traffic to the higher bandwidth or lower bandwidth cost link.



"BGP then is used to Wrap (I guess) the packets exiting the company and going out on the internet..."

BGP itself doesn't wrap anything.   BGP populates a RIB on a router that accepts routes from other routers  --  you can run BGP,  OSPF, or other routing protocols inside  of a  MPLS cloud, however;  for example,  a customer edge router,  might exchange routes with other customer routers in the MPLS cloud,   or between customer edge router and provider edge router.

Under ordinary circumstances,  BGP would be used for inter-domain routing, and and an internal gateway protocol such as OSPF has to be used to provide internal routing within a domain or autonomous system,  and establishment of  Label switched paths.


In case of a routing protocol running inside a MPLS environment,  the Routing information database, created by the routing protocol,  will only see routes associated with the instances running inside that customer's MPLS cloud.

   You can also run BGP on a tunnel.    In either case,  BGP itself isn't doing the wrapping, however,  it is the combination of BGP with another technology


"MPLS, is also used by S. Providers, but I guess companies can use it only when they need specific services such as QOS and site to site VPN (different than traditional VPN)."

 MPLS is implemented by service providers, and on Enterprises using service provider links to build networks between remote sites,  typically:  (sites that cannot be directly connected at Layer 2/Ethernet).  

 MPLS involves packets being marked with a label,  and a label switched path (LSP), also referred to as a 'mpls tunnel' is created through the provider network;  typically two paths -- one in the forward direction, and one in the reverse direction.

MPLS provides a mechanism, where raw packets are forwarded between two customer devices, at different locations, by the service provider,  without regard to IP addressing.

A label is attached to a packet at the label edge router when forwarding to the provider edge router  at one point,  and the packet is received at  another label edge router,  which is selected by the choice of MPLS label.


This allows MPLS to be used to provides certain similarities to a VPN function, which is sometimes referred to VPLS when MPLS is used for this, however: it is significant to realize,  unlike a VPN,  there is not encryption,  and there is not the normal overhead associated with VPN or protocol tunnelling;   a  MPLS tunnel does not encapsulate one protocol within another,  such as  IP  inside UDP.

The "tunnelling" mechanism is a short sequence of bits,  that is carried on the packets,  between,  the Label edge routers  (LERs).

Because of this,  MPLS  has much lower protocol overhead and performance impact than a VPN;  however,     it also  has a potential security ramification.
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by:jskfan
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thank you
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