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Network Routing and Design Question

Posted on 2013-01-18
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Last Modified: 2013-02-05
We have a remote office which is connected via fiber and also also microwave links.  The fiber is a direct connection terminated into an ONT and then copper to the switches.  We have the layer 3 switches terminating both sides of the fiber.  Then we have also the routers unlinked to those switches.  The routers terminate our microwave t1 connections.  My goal is to have the fiber be the main link and if it were to go down then to failover to the microwave.  Not sure how to achieve this with the switches showing the fiber as directly connected.
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Question by:beepat
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6 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:IanTh
ID: 38794199
what routers have you got as that's a router function , wan fail over

you will need the fibers going into the router too
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by:beepat
ID: 38794219
They are layer 3 switches which should be able to handle this.
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by:agonza07
ID: 38795707
what type of switches and routers do you have? Do they support routing protocols?

Since you are using T1 interfaces for the microwaves you're going to have to do the failover through the routers. Just as IanTh said, you'll need to do WAN failover.

If your layer 3 switches are your default gateways and can do routing protocols, then you should be able to let them handle the traffic and failover.
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by:pergr
ID: 38796202
You need to run ospf between all your routing devices, and then your goal will be achieved.

Ospf will prefer the link with most nominal bandwidth.
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by:beepat
ID: 38815625
We are running HP L3 Switches and Cisco Routers
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agonza07 earned 500 total points
ID: 38816057
Yup, OSPF would be the way to go and then just get it to see the network like you want it.

http://www.netcraftsmen.net/resources/archived-articles/434-introducing-ospf.html
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