Windows Terminal Server brute-force attempts

Posted on 2013-01-18
Medium Priority
Last Modified: 2013-02-15
Somebody is constantly running automated brute-force attacks against a Windows Server 2003 Terminal Server I published on WAN.
It is joined to a domain and I have Account Lockout Threshold GPO defined to lockout an account after 3 login attempts.
I also use local accounts on this server and I also set up local GPO Account Lockout Threshold to 3 login attempts.

But I still see regular logs in Event Viewer for numerous failed login attempts for non-existing domain and local users. These seem to be common usernames like admin, root, scan, etc.

What could I do to block all these attempts alltogether?
Question by:proteus-IV
  • 2
LVL 10

Assisted Solution

rscottvan earned 1500 total points
ID: 38795291
If this server does not to be accessible from the whole internet, you can use Windows firewall, or preferably a hardware firewall, to restrict the systems that can attempt access.

You can also move RDP a less well-known port.  http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306759.

Accepted Solution

proteus-IV earned 0 total points
ID: 38875180
I will upgrade the OS to Windows 2008 and implement certificate based authentication.

Author Closing Comment

ID: 38892648
Incomplete solution.

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