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Installing two executables in one folder

Posted on 2013-01-19
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My VB6 project has two executables, with associated (shared) data files, and one OCX (used by both executables).

Because data files are shared between the two executables, It would be best if both sets of files were installed into the same folder on the client’s machine.

Preparing to make the installer: At this moment, I have each set of files in separate folders named “BuildA” and “BuildB”. (I’ve taken care that there are no name duplicates.)

What is the proper way to build my installer?

I’m open to suggestions for a commercial installer, or should I use the one available in VB?
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Question by:NormaPosy
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Martin Liss earned 2000 total points
ID: 38797185
Well, I can tell you for sure that the Package & Deployment Wizard that comes with VB6 is not the one to use unless your user community all use Window XP or earlier. The reason for that is as you are probably aware, VB6 is out of date and while it is still very useful, the P&D Wizard knows nothing about the post-XP operating systems. Here's a page that talks about some alternatives. Note that the InnoSetup that's mentioned has a more user-friendly UI called InnoScript.
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by:Martin Liss
ID: 38797194
The JSWare products mentioned (which I wasn't aware of) look very interesting.
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by:NormaPosy
ID: 38797620
Martin:

Do I understand correctly that InnoSetup will do whatever conversion is necessary to have the installed application run on Windows 7?
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by:Martin Liss
ID: 38797731
Support for every Windows release since 2000, including: Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, and Windows 2000. (No service packs are required.)
The above is from their website.
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Author Comment

by:NormaPosy
ID: 38797765
OK. Good so far. InnoScript is easy to use.

These installers seem to assume there will be just one exe. I have two, and since they read files generated by each other, it would be most convenient if both installed into the same folder.

Tomorrow I will run InnoScript twice, telling it to install into the same folder.

There is an alternative: I could make a VB "dashboard" having only two command buttons (plus "Exit" of course). That will require me to combine my two VB individual projects into one. That is going to be tedious, but it might be worth the effort.

Or, I might try customizing the InnoScript's script to create two programs in the same folder, with the two corresponding desktop shortcuts.

Another alternative is to store the communicating files somewhere else, and let InnoScript make two separate installations. That will require some source code revision, but that will not be difficult.

I appreciate your help. I will get back to you tomorrow. Hopefully this question can be closed then.
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Author Closing Comment

by:NormaPosy
ID: 38798806
Thank you, Martin.

InnoSetup seems to be what I was looking for. Smooth and easy to use, too.

My "dashboard" idea:

Rather than combine source code for my two executables under one "Main" dashboard, I am going to leave them as they are. I am going to make a simple VB "dashboard" with two command buttons, each of which will launch one of my existing program executables.

I don't know how to do that, but I will post it as a new question.
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by:Martin Liss
ID: 38798827
You're welcome and I'm glad I was able to help.

Marty - MVP 2009 to 2012
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