Solved

Change If Statement to a Case Statement

Posted on 2013-01-20
9
316 Views
Last Modified: 2013-02-06
How do I change the following to a  Select case statement?

If ActivityCode = "sig32" And Agency = "HPD" Then
MsgBox "Contact HPD"

Else

End If

Open in new window

0
Comment
Question by:mickeyshelley1
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • +2
9 Comments
 
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:IrogSinta
ID: 38799825
May I ask why you want to change this to a Select Case statement when what you have suffices?
0
 
LVL 75

Accepted Solution

by:
DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP) earned 500 total points
ID: 38799842
This really doesn't fit Select Case ... since you have two different items (Activity Code and Agency) ... and only one condition.

Leave as is ...

mx
0
 
LVL 75
ID: 38799844
All you need is this:

If ActivityCode = "sig32" And Agency = "HPD" Then MsgBox "Contact HPD"
0
Use Case: Protecting a Hybrid Cloud Infrastructure

Microsoft Azure is rapidly becoming the norm in dynamic IT environments. This document describes the challenges that organizations face when protecting data in a hybrid cloud IT environment and presents a use case to demonstrate how Acronis Backup protects all data.

 
LVL 92

Expert Comment

by:Patrick Matthews
ID: 38801217
As indicated above, this is not really a candidate for Select Case, which only evaluates one variable at a time.

You could do something like this:

Select Case ActivityCode
    Case "sig32"
        If Agency = "HPD" Then
            MsgBox "Contact HPD"
        Else
            ' do something else
        End If
    Case Else
        ' Whatever
End Select

Open in new window


However, that's no real improvement on what you already have :)
0
 

Author Comment

by:mickeyshelley1
ID: 38801262
This is just a part of the code, the complete code will have multiple if statements and I figured that a case statement would be a little less cluttered and more efficient.
0
 
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:IrogSinta
ID: 38801290
You could do this:
Select Case TRUE
    Case ActivityCode = "sig32" And Agency = "HPD"
        ....
    Case ...
         ....
End Select
0
 

Author Comment

by:mickeyshelley1
ID: 38801423
Are there any performance considerations in a scenario with multiple ELSEIF  that would make a case statement a better choice; that is the primary reason for my question
0
 
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:IrogSinta
ID: 38801451
I don't think there is a performance difference. If there is, it would be negligible.  I understand what you mean about less cluttered. I prefer using Select Case to multiple If ElseIf statements myself.
0
 
LVL 74

Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 38856566
<no points wanted>

From what I have read, a "One Variable" Case Select will always run faster than the corresponding If-Then-Else

But like IrogSinta, my guess is that the real world performance difference will not be of any real consequence.

I'm a bit old school, but I will admit that the Case Select can look neater.

But I tend to go with If/then/else because it is easier to understand in "Human" terms.
For example, the human request:
"If the Price is 2, then make the price box red"
...converts almost verbatim to:
If Price=2 then
    price.Backcolor=VBred
end if
;-)

But again, most current developer will use Select Case when the need is clear...
Again, I am a bit old school.

;-)

Jeff
0

Featured Post

Migrating Your Company's PCs

To keep pace with competitors, businesses must keep employees productive, and that means providing them with the latest technology. This document provides the tips and tricks you need to help you migrate an outdated PC fleet to new desktops, laptops, and tablets.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

When you are entering numbers in a speadsheet, and don't remember what 6×7 is, you just type “=6*7" instead. It works in every cell! This is not so in Access. To enter the elusive 42 in a text box, you have to find a calculator, and then copy the re…
QuickBooks® has a great invoice interface that we were happy with for a while but that changed in 2001 through no fault of Intuit®. Our industry's unit names are dictated by RUS: the Rural Utilities Services division of USDA. Contracts contain un…
Get people started with the utilization of class modules. Class modules can be a powerful tool in Microsoft Access. They allow you to create self-contained objects that encapsulate functionality. They can easily hide the complexity of a process from…
With Microsoft Access, learn how to start a database in different ways and produce different start-up actions allowing you to use a single database to perform multiple tasks. Specify a start-up form through options: Specify an Autoexec macro: Us…

825 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question