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C# - Class-level variables (fields) with instantiation seem weird. Are they?

Posted on 2013-01-21
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Last Modified: 2013-01-22
Take a look at the following code snippet that one of my subs created. He created some class-level variables (or fields) and then went ahead and instantiated them. My inclination would have been to declare the variables at the class level and then instantiate them in the class constructor or an appropriate method. I have to admit, the calls to the variables do work. Maybe his construct is a good one, and I just don't get it.

   class FlatFileParser
   {
      private ADOBoulder adoBoulder = new ADOBoulder();
      private FieldMapping fldMapp = new FieldMapping();
      private int intLineNo = 0;
      private bool isErrorFile = false;
      ...

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Question by:jdana
3 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:CodeCruiser
ID: 38802748
You can declare and instantiate variables in one go. Its a matter of personal preference though I would prefer to instantiate reference type variables in a code block where I can log errors.
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anarki_jimbel earned 1220 total points
ID: 38803989
The approach you described here is valid one. There is nothing wrong to declare and instantiate variables on the class level (say, in "declarations section"). Also, as you can see, the compiler allows that, so it means there is nothing wrong !

See, for example, we have the following code:
    public class MyTest
    {
        private int someNumber=77;
        private string someString;
        
        private double someNumber2;
        private string someString2 = "b";

        public MyTest()
        {
            someNumber2 = 33;
            someString = "a";
        }
    }

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Lines 'private int someNumber=77;' and 'private string someString2 = "b";' are executed first, even before calling the constructor. Then the constructor is called. The someString and someNumber2 variables are NOT allocated before entering the constructor!

You may consider the initialization of  'private int someNumber=77;' and 'private string someString2 = "b";'  variables as a part of the class constructor.

This is a matter of preferences and a personal taste. Or "religious" matter, as out architect tells :). Personally myself, I like to keep initialization code in a constructor or in some other method. I believe it makes code more readable and maintainable.
I'd say the demonstrated approach was very popular among VB developers :).
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Author Closing Comment

by:jdana
ID: 38805794
anarki_jimbel,

Thanks for the thoughtful response. Like you, I prefer to put initialization of the variables in the constructor. Keep it clean, and the code behaves as expected.

J
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